Apple unveils the eMac all-in-one computer

Targeted toward the education market, Apple's new eMac is an all-in-one 17-inch CRT with a 700MHz PowerPC G4 processor. The eMac is shaped like its iMac cousin but is 8 mm less deep than the original 15-inch iMac.

"Our education customers asked us to design a desktop computer specifically for them," said Steve Jobs, Apple's CEO. "The new eMac features a 17-inch flat CRT and a powerful G4 processor, while preserving the all-in-one compact enclosure that educators love."

The eMac includes five USB ports and two FireWire ports, as well as a choice of a tray-loading CD-ROM drive or DVD-ROM/CD-RW Combo drive for watching DVDs and burning CDs.

Additional eMac features include a 40GB ATA Hard Drive; built-in 10/100BASE-T Ethernet; a 56K V.90 modem (some models); support for optional AirPort wireless networking; a total viewable image size of 16 inches on the 17-inch flat CRT; an audio-in port, headphone jack, and integrated 16-watt digital amplifier and stereo speakers for great stereo sound; GeForce2 MX 3D AGP 2X graphics with 32MB of Double Date Rate(DDR) video memory; a software bundle offering AppleWorks, QuickTime, Mac OS X Mail, Microsoft Internet Explorer, WorldBook Mac OS X Edition, PCalc and Acrobat Reader; Mac OS X version 10.1.4, Mac OS 9.2.2; and Apple's optical Pro mouse and full-size Apple Pro Keyboard.

An eMac priced at US$999 includes:

  • 700 MHz PowerPC G4 processor;
  • 128MB SDRAM;
  • CD-ROM optical drive; and
  • 40GB ATA Hard Drive.
  • An eMac priced at $1,199 includes:

  • 700 MHz PowerPC G4 processor;
  • 128MB SDRAM;
  • CD-RW/DVD-ROM Combo optical drive;
  • 40GB ATA Hard Drive; and
  • 56K V.90 modem.
  • The new eMac will be available to education customers in the US and Canada in May through the Apple Store for Education.

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