Macworld's Palm Links

At some point, everyone suffers from bookmark bloat. You click on a link, figure it could be useful later, and add it to your favorites. A month later, you notice 120 unsorted links and delete them en masse. Two months later, you're looking for the information you thought you had bookmarked, and cursing yourself for cleaning out the bookmarks file.

Palm users aren't immune to this malady. Fortunately, we've come up with a solution by gathering all our Palm links in one place; bookmark this one page as a reference point for several other articles.

The first step to becoming a Palm maven is, of course, owning a Palm. Now that there are so many models on the market, which one is best for you? We've done a comparative survey of eight different handhelds on the market, testing them for everything from applications to connectivity. You can also read in-depth Macworld reviews of the following handhelds: the Palm IIIe, the most affordable and least intimidating one in the bunch; the Palm IIIC, which packs 8MB of memory with a color screen and impressive battery performance; the sleek Palm V - which offers a tradeoff of improved portability against decreased peripheral availability; and the wireless 'Net-surfing Palm VII. You can read all four reviews to decide which model you'll be sporting.

After you get your Palm, you'll face the problem of putting data in it. While you can always rely on the desktop version of the Palm software and a quick HotSync, you might run into other obstacles. Some folks have a hard time with Grafitti, the stylus-driven method for scribbling content into your Palm; they might want to consider a Palm portable keyboard instead.

The other problem lays with the HotSync cable itself: it 's not USB-ready. Fortunately, Palm's got a USB Conect Kit to help any G3-using Palm owners. Unfortunately, the improved connectivity doesn't really help Palm owners who have OS 9.0.4. The operating system is incompatible with the software that HotSyncs handheld data with its desktop counterpart. In order to keep everything sync'ing smoothly on your machine, you'll need an update; Macworld tells you where to get it.

Once you've ironed out input and sync'ing problems, you can take advantage of one of the Palm's greatest features: its portability. If you're new to using Palms in general, we recommend checking out our survey of software for the Palm. We've also rounded up and rated some of the best programs, and assessed how desktop workhorses like Filemaker Pro and Eudora work in the palm of your hand. And for hard-core Palm software types, we've selected our favorite shareware. Portability also encompasses gadgets that optimize your handheld's performance or capability; we've taken a look at the most promising peripherals.

Once you've worked your way through these hyperlinks, you should have a great understanding of what you can get out of your Palm. Now bookmark us and begin becoming a handheld guru.

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