ODBC SDK update out for Mac OS Classic, Mac OS X

Version 3.0.5 of the Open Source iODBC software developer kit (SDK) for Mac OS Classic and Mac OS X is now available from OpenLink Software, a provider of Universal Data Access Middleware. (QDBC stands for Open Database Connectivity.)

This release enables the development of ODBC version 3.5 drivers and applications, includes a native Graphical ODBC Administrator for Mac OS X and Mac OS 9, and an ODBC Driver Manager component that supports both ODBC 2.x and ODBC 3.x drivers and applications.

"OpenLink is firmly committed to empowering Mac end-users and developers, by giving them the ability to use and develop database independent applications respectively," said Andrew Hill, director of technology evangelism at OpenLink Software, in a statement. "To that end, iODBC is released under a dual Open Source license, and may be distributed under either the BSD or LGPL license,''

"It's a great benefit to REALbasic developers that OpenLink has released the iODBC Driver Manager for the Mac," said Lorin Rivers, Product Manager for REAL Software's REALbasic. "We're glad that OpenLink had made this commitment to the Mac developer community, ensuring application developers will have access to standards compliant ODBC libraries and drivers."

For more information on iODBC, and to download the iODBC SDK or Driver Manager, cruise on over to the OpenLink Web site. OpenLink's product portfolio for the Mac includes the iODBC SDK, iODBC Driver Manager, a complete set of high-performance ODBC and JDBC Drivers, plus the Virtuoso Internet Data Integration server.

iODBC enables the development and deployment of database centric applications compatible with the Microsoft ODBC 2.x & X/Open SQL CLI data access standards.

The iODBC Driver Manager is a development & runtime Interface that links iODBC or ODBC compliant applications to iODBC or ODBC compliant data access drivers.

ODBC or iODBC Drivers provide development & runtime implementations of the iODBC & ODBC data access interfaces. They are also the components that actually connect directly to the backend database engines.

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