When is wireless not wireless, or what's blocking me in Denver?

I'm writing this in the Denver airport, waiting for a flight home from the East Coast. You won't read this immediately after I post it, because the much-ballyhooed wireless access here at the airport isn't for me and my 15-inch PowerBook with an Airport Extreme card.

I have been through Denver approximately eight times in the past year, and every time I try to connect, I get the same error message. Maybe it's only supposed to be for PC laptops - the signs plastered around the airport trumpet "wireless access available here" and are paired with Intel's Centrino logo - but it shouldn't be. (On my way through here earlier this week, a guy next to me on a PC also couldn't get on, but I've found that to be a pretty common occurrence, especially on older PC laptops.)

True to form, there's no help anywhere, and I have tried everything I can to make it work, so I sit when I'd like to be checking email or surfing the Web.

What's most frustrating about this is that the Denver airport is the only place I've been unable to connect to a supposedly public network. I probably have spent 60 hours on public networks in the past few months, and Denver is the only one to say no.

I consider myself a pretty savvy user, but I can't figure this one out. Apple's made it pretty brainless to join a public 802.11 network - OS X even asks you if you want to join a new Airport network when it sees one. If anyone has any ideas - other than the fact that they don't like Macs in Denver - let me know. Otherwise, I guess I'll just start flying through Chicago.

[Now that I'm back home, and online again - I can't find anything, at least via Google, that might help me understand why my Mac can't join that network.]

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