10 things to know about Tiger

10 Tiger features we’d like to see

Ten down, 140 to go. Apple probably has plenty of other features it plans to unveil between now and Tiger’s estimated early 2005 release. But just in case Apple programmers are stumped, here are a couple of ideas we’ve gleaned from staff, our contributors, and users of the Macworld.com forums on what might make for other nice additions to Tiger.

1. Location Management: OS X already has some smart capabilities, such as autosensing the appropriate network connection. Wouldn’t it be great if the OS could also change a number of different settings—your default SMTP server, your default printer, and even your iChat status—just by knowing the name of the active 802.11 base station or your Mac’s current IP address?

2. Users And Groups: A return of this OS 9-era control panel would make it easier to control file sharing and permissions on your home network.

3. Spring-Loaded Folders in the Dock: Sure, it’s fun to drag an item on top of a folder in the Finder and have that folder automatically open. How about the same effect if you drag an item onto a folder in the Dock?

4. Adopting from XP: Not every idea to come out of Redmond is a bad one. Windows XP sports Open and Save dialog boxes that allow file renaming and deletion. Perhaps Tiger should, too.

5. Sherlock, Revisited: Remember Sherlock, OS X’s built-in app for displaying customized information in content-specific windows? Well, Apple seems to have forgotten it. And Tiger provides an opportunity for better integration between Sherlock and other apps.

6. Label Fixes: When labeled folders show up in the sidebar and Dock, it’d be nice if their assigned colors did too.

7. External drive support: Wouldn’t it be great if you could tote your entire user folder around easily on an external FireWire drive? And wouldn’t it be even better if you could plug that drive into another Mac and log right in, just as if it were your own?

8. Quick Access to Files: OS 9 had the Apple Menu. Windows has the Start Menu. Why not create a dedicated user-editable menu for quick file launching within OS X?

9. Smarter Trash: After years of having a one-Trash-for-all-volumes approach, OS X could let users control-click on the Trash and choose to only empty files from particular volumes.

10. AirTunes Everywhere: How about extending the new AirTunes protocol so that any application, not just iTunes, can target its audio output to speakers that are driven by an AirPort Express?

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