capsule review

Razer pro|tone m250

At a Glance
  • Razer pro|tone m250

    Macworld Rating

Razer's pro|tone m250, part of the company's recent foray into headphones, features an earclip design -- the m250 uses larger-than-earbud earpieces, but instead of a plastic or metal over-the-head connecting band, each earpiece attaches to your ear using an adjustable clip. Many people prefer earclips over earbuds, especially for use while exercising, because of the added stability the clip design offers, as well as the potential for better sound quality thanks to larger drivers.

The m250's earpieces are indeed comfortable. Despite a brushed-metal outer casing, each earpiece weighs less than an ounce and features a soft, gray pad that rests against your ear and a rubber-covered earclip that swivels away from the earpiece to make putting on the earpiece easier. Once they've been on your ears for a few minutes, you almost forget they're there; I was able to wear them for hours comfortably.

On the other hand, unlike several other earclip-style headphones I've tested, the m250's earpieces don't feel very snug. During vigorous exercise, they tend to come off, and even just leaning to the side -- for example, to pick up something off the floor next to your chair -- makes the earpiece on that side feel unstable.

In terms of sound quality, the m250 is the rare headphone that sounds slightly tinny (thanks to lots of treble detail without much midrange presence) while also providing decent bass response; however, to get that bass, you need to make sure the earpieces are pressed firmly against your ears -- something that's difficult to do given the earclips' emphasis on comfort.

The m250's white cable is 3.5 feet long, a good length for keeping your iPod in your pocket or for exercising, as it's long enough to reach anywhere you might want to store your iPod but not so long as to dangle excessively. Razer includes a nice neoprene carrying case, as well as an adapter for using the m250 with older, two-prong airline headphone jacks.

Overall, the m250 is a stylish set of headphones with comfort that's ideal for long-term wearing at a desk or walking around. However, those prioritize top-notch sound over looks will want to shop around. For example, Koss' KSC-75 earclip model offers considerably better sound quality for around $15 to $20, albeit in a less-attractive design.
Razer's pro|tone m250, part of the company's recent foray into headphones, features an earclip design -- the m250 uses larger-than-earbud earpieces, but instead of a plastic or metal over-the-head connecting band, each earpiece attaches to your ear using an adjustable clip. Many people prefer earclips over earbuds, especially for use while exercising, because of the added stability the clip design offers, as well as the potential for better sound quality thanks to larger drivers.

The m250's earpieces are indeed comfortable. Despite a brushed-metal outer casing, each earpiece weighs less than an ounce and features a soft, gray pad that rests against your ear and a rubber-covered earclip that swivels away from the earpiece to make putting on the earpiece easier. Once they've been on your ears for a few minutes, you almost forget they're there; I was able to wear them for hours comfortably.

On the other hand, unlike several other earclip-style headphones I've tested, the m250's earpieces don't feel very snug. During vigorous exercise, they tend to come off, and even just leaning to the side -- for example, to pick up something off the floor next to your chair -- makes the earpiece on that side feel unstable.

In terms of sound quality, the m250 is the rare headphone that sounds slightly tinny (thanks to lots of treble detail without much midrange presence) while also providing decent bass response; however, to get that bass, you need to make sure the earpieces are pressed firmly against your ears -- something that's difficult to do given the earclips' emphasis on comfort.

The m250's white cable is 3.5 feet long, a good length for keeping your iPod in your pocket or for exercising, as it's long enough to reach anywhere you might want to store your iPod but not so long as to dangle excessively. Razer includes a nice neoprene carrying case, as well as an adapter for using the m250 with older, two-prong airline headphone jacks.

Overall, the m250 is a stylish set of headphones with comfort that's ideal for long-term wearing at a desk or walking around. However, those prioritize top-notch sound over looks will want to shop around. For example, Koss' KSC-75 earclip model offers considerably better sound quality for around $15 to $20, albeit in a less-attractive design.--Dan Frakes

To comment on this article and other Macworld content, visit our Facebook page or our Twitter feed.
At a Glance
  • Razer pro|tone m250

    Macworld Rating
Related:
Notice to our Readers
We're now using social media to take your comments and feedback. Learn more about this here.