Remains of the Day: Great Scott!

We haven’t even hollied all our jollies out yet, but a brand spankin’ new year is nearly upon us. As 2011 approaches, we share stories about how iOS devices can seem to help manipulate the very fabric of time. These are your remainders for Wednesday, December 22.

Yes, Virginia, There Is a Santa, And These Digital Photos Prove It (The Wall Street Journal)

When the Journal isn’t decrying the fact that iPhone apps are sharing your personal data, it’s celebrating the fact that iPhone apps can help you lie to your children about Ol’ Saint Nick. (Spoiler alert, kids: he’s fake.) Indeed, tech-savvy parents who want to extend their kids’ childhoods ever longer can use apps like Elf Cam to fake grainy, green-tinted night vision shots of Santa in your home. I’m holding out for the app that shows Grandma, paralyzed from the waist down, pinned under Blitzen.

Times Square New Year’s gets official iPhone, Android apps (Electronista)

Even as you try to keep your kids from growing up, time is still marching on. Even before a Snooki-filled ball drops at midnight to announce 2011’s arrival, you can have your own personal celebration to ring in the new year with the official Times Square Official New Year’s Eve Ball App. Remember, a party of one—even a lonely, iPhone-wielding party of one—is still a party.

L.A. officials set to unveil an iPhone app (LA Times Blog)

As it was just a paragraph ago, time is still marching on. And if you hate wasting what precious time you still have trolling for parking spots—and you happen to park frequently in Hollywood—you’ll be thrilled to learn about the new Parker app. The Mayor’s Office in Los Angeles calls the app “the nation’s first-ever mobile application to give drivers a faster and more convenient way to find open metered parking spaces and nearby garages.” Remember, of course, that it’s illegal to use your phone while driving in LA. So, good luck with that.

Plato’s iPad (YouTube)

Artist Adam Reeder (no relation to the app of the same name) shares this time-lapse video, wherein he sculpts Plato holding an iPad. That is, Plato’s holding the iPad. Adam’s holding the clay, I presume. Why Plato, and why holding an anachronistic iPad? The piece is actually an evolution of Reeder’s Gods With iPods series, which depicts Pan, Atlas, Zeus, and other fine gods with various portable Apple devices. Perhaps this will be the start of Reeder’s Greeks Who Could Have Been Geeks collection.

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