Weekly Wrap: MobileMe hosting says goodbye, Final Cut X says hello

Summertime is upon us! As is a copious quantity of sunblock! With summer’s arrival, you can be forgiven if you chose to spend a few hours outdoors over the past week, instead of fastidiously checking Macworld’s website for new stories every five minutes like I do. Here’s what you may have missed.

Final Cut Pro X

Final Cut Pro X’s release this past week
Was met with responses both cheery and bleak
It’s new and improved and fills a groovy niche,
But it’s also a lot more, well, iMovie-ish.
Serenity Caldwell opines X is better,
Though it turns out it’s just a 3.5 mice getter.
The new Final Cut’s a bit buggy—and how!
But we have workarounds thanks to Mr. Landau.
If Final Cut X turns your angst to 11
Remember that you can keep on running 7.

MobileMe and iCloud

As Michael Gartenberg wrote last Sunday, Apple’s cutting the cord with iCloud, and we’re soon going to be firmly ensconced in a post-PC world. Cord cutting, as any new father can tell you, gets messy sometimes: Apple announced this week that MobileMe features like iWeb and Gallery hosting and iDisk will all shuffle off this mortal coil by June 30, 2012. On the plus side, the company confirmed that you’ll have Web-based access to iCloud Mail, Contacts, Calendar, and Find My iPhone on icloud.com come this fall. Of course, Dropbox reminded us why we should all be a little wary about cloud services when the service erroneously allowed users access to anyone else’s Dropbox account for a few hours. Try not to think about it.

New Apple hardware and software

Apple updated the Time Capsule, introducing a new 3TB variant of its Wi-Fi hard drive. And the company also released a minor revision to the AirPort Extreme base station, but tried to do so when no one was looking.

With a bit more fanfare, Apple issued what may well be the last ever Snow Leopard update, 10.6.8. Along with the OS update came Security Update 2011-004, which is as exciting as its name portends.

iPhone and iPad

You take the good, you take the bad, you take them both, and then you have the week in iPhone carrier-related announcements. Verizon’s unlimited mobile data plans are going the way of MobileMe iWeb hosting (boo!), but T-Mobile continues to welcome iPhone customers and says more than one million iPhones are on its network.

Rich Mogull wrote up a slew of tips on how to use your iPad securely. (Surprisingly, he missed no-brainers like “wear a helmet” and “avoid wild animals.”) I wrote up a guide for beginners on creating and organizing iOS folders. And Chris Breen helps you boost your EQ IQ with his guide to the iTunes equalizer and iOS devices.

If you were hoping to grab the ThirdIntifada iPhone app, you’re too late; Apple pulled it. If you were hoping to surf the New York Post’s website from your iPad, you can’t; the company now requires you use its iPad app instead. But if you want to put your iPhone in a fancy new case or play a quick game of Tiny Wings, that you can do.

Other apps we reviewed this past week included Smart Pad, iCatcher, Pocketbooth, and a pair of iPad bedtime apps. We hope only those last apps, not the reviews themselves, put you to sleep.

The Law

On the legal front, Apple fared pretty well this week. The company was awarded a patent on the iPhone’s multitouch interface. Lodsys, the company suing iOS developers for infringing its patents, requested more time to reply to Apple’s motion to intervene in the case. And the International Trade Commission gave itself an extra week to rule on an ongoing patent case that pits Apple alongside RIM against Kodak. If covering the latest Apple legal developments is a crime, consider Macworld very, very guilty.

Tips and How-to’s

Erstwhile Macworld staff editor David Chartier wrote up a tutorial on how and why to search Twitter—and each sentence is exactly 140 characters long. (Note: One part of the previous sentence is a lie.) Alexandera Chang wrote up 500px, a new photo-sharing site. We also helped you figure out which apps won’t work on Lion, find and play high definition audio, and monitor your Mac from your Dock. We really are very nice, very helpful people. By the way, you have something stuck in your teeth.

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