Remains of the Day: Threat assessment

One game maker makes an impromptu retreat from the field of battle, while Apple brings all its firepower to bear on content negotiations and the iPad is strategically deployed in bureaucratic trouble spots. The remainders for Friday, March 2, 2012 are oscar mike.

EA permanently suspending development on Battlefield 3: Aftershock (Vox Games)

Electronic Arts says it will not be reinstating the iOS version of Battlefield 3, which it pulled from the App Store in February after customers complained of wide-ranging problems. A shame, especially after EA spent all that money on an exclusive theme song by Pat Benatar—“Love is a Battlefield 3: Aftershock for iOS.”

Apple throws weight around in TV negotiations (New York Post)

Rumor has it that Apple senior vice president Eddy Cue has been negotiating with content providers over a streaming TV service. Media executives have supposedly been reluctant to commit, due to Apple’s demands to control both content and pricing. But, as we all know, Apple likes to play hardball, and the last thing anybody—high-powered executive or mere mortal—wants to hear when they pick up their phone is the scariest three words in the English language: “This is Tim.”

iPad use by city leaders one example of changing with the times (City of Vancouver)

From airplane cockpits to the halls of city government, the iPad is revolutionizing how we deal with paper documents. In January, the City Council of Vancouver, Washington launched its paperless initiative, and only two months later, they’ve used 40 percent less paper for meetings. And played 100 percent more Words with Friends.

Retina display Macs, iPads, and HiDPI: Doing the Math (TUAW)

TUAW’s Richard Gaywood runs the numbers on the much buzzed-about iPad 3 and concludes that when it comes to Retina displays, the eyes have it.

iPads using iOS 6, high-res displays showing up in Ars server logs (Ars Technica)

The team at Ars Technica discovered, while digging through their server logs, that they had been visited by a strange entity: a device claiming to have a screen resolution of 2048-by-1536 pixels—coincidentally, just what’s been rumored for the iPad 3. In addition, they found reports that some visitors were running iOS 6. Which reminds me: I really need to stop spoofing my browser’s user agent string. And reloading Ars Technica hundreds of times.

Apple TV stock shortages appear, sources say new model imminent (The Verge)

Everybody may be talking about a new iPad, but what about a new Apple TV? The Verge points out that Apple TVs are out of stock at a number of stores, with availability not listed until on or after March 7, the day of Apple’s media event next week. So either a new Apple TV is in the offing, or the company is planning quite a blowout to celebrate the 27th anniversary of the international release of “We Are the World.”

Air Force Gives $9 Million Award for as Many as 18,000 IPads (Bloomberg)

It would seem the Air Force is indeed purchasing iPads, as planned. While an Air Force Special Operations order for iPads was cancelled last month, the plan to buy between 63 and 18,000 iPads for use as electronic flight bags for the service’s Air Mobility Command is officially a go. Though when you think of all the information they can store, they should really more appropriately be called “electronic flight bags of holding.” Eh? Eh?

Product News:

Capo 2.1.5 - SuperMegaUltraGroovy's music learning app has been updated to version 2.1.5. The update incorporates a mastering-quality audio slowing and pitch-shifting engine, designed to help users make out notes and beats at greatly slowed speeds. (Examples can be heard on Capo's website, under the audio tab.) Available on the Mac App Store. Free update for current users, $50 for new users, free trial available on Capo's website.

Subscribe to the Create Newsletter

Comments