Tax rebate gives Apple $7.4 million to build new campus

A tax rebate that would give Apple $7.4 million to build a new campus in Austin has been agreed following a public hearing, despite a former Travis County Judge saying he was against Apple receiving any tax breaks.

The new campus is expected to create up to 3,600 jobs. Travis County Commissioner Sarah Eckhardt has requested that Apple agrees to certain job guarantees and helps fund Lone Star Rail in order to receive the tax rebates.

To qualify for the tax breaks, Apple should hire economically disadvantaged locals, the unemployed, those who have been through targeted job training, and those who live in a poor area, according to the terms of the agreement. Travis County is offering Apple an 80 percent rebate on its tax bill for ten years, with the potential that it can extend to 15 years, according to Statesman.

According to County Judge Sam Biscoe, county staff will need to negotiate with Apple. Chief among the negotiating terms, Biscoe said, is making sure Apple hires some proportion of “economically disadvantaged” people, Biscoe wouldn’t say what percentage the county is shooting for, saying it might undermine private negotiations with Apple.

The Statesman reports that there are three government-backed subsidies currently being offered to Apple.—including and already agreed $8.6 million in tax breaks from the City of Austin, and a proposed $21 million incentive package from the Texas Enterprise Fund.

Apple is also planning to update its data center in North Carolina that supports the iCloud online data storage system and its Siri voice-recognition software. The company has filed its plans with the North Carolina Utilities Commission.

The Facility will be fuelled by Directed Biogas, “a renewable energy source,” according to Apple’s filing. In the filing, Apple said that the initial fuel cell systems may begin generating electricity as early as June.

The facility will be the largest private fuel cell energy project, a non-polluting silent power plant that will generate electricity from hydrogen.

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