Remains of the Day: Crazy like a Foxconn

Foxconn’s CEO didn’t say what you think he said, the Supremes shut down Psystar, and more states pile on Apple in the ebook price-fixing case. The remainders for Tuesday, May 15, 2012 are so crazy they’re sane.

Foxconn: reports that CEO Terry Gou confirmed the Apple iTV are ‘not accurate’ (update) (The Verge)

The other day, when tech pubs reported that Foxconn CEO Terry Gou said the company was tooling up for an Apple TV set? Yeah, uh, not so much. A statement from Foxconn says that Gou simply said the company was ready to meet its customers’ manufacturing needs. But, really, who would have reported on that?

Supreme Court denies Psystar’s appeal in Mac clone case (CNet)

Hasta la vista, Psystar. The clone-maker’s appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court was denied on Monday, putting to an end the four-year struggle. “We are sad,” the company’s attorney told CNet. Couldn’t have put it better myself.

Oops! Five CEOs Who Should Have Already Been Fired (Cisco, GE, WalMart, Sears, Microsoft) (Forbes)

Forbes’s Adam Hartung rounds up five CEOs who should have been on the chopping block. Number one with a bullet point? Everybody’s favorite: Steve Ballmer. Oh, come on. That’s hardly fair. Just because the stock has plummeted during his tenure? Or because of the disaster that was Windows Vista? Or the company’s too-little too-late smartphone and tablet strategies? Come on.

As 17 more states join class action against book publishers and Apple, new details revealed (paidContent)

A passel of states have joined the class action lawsuit against Macmillan, Penguin, and Apple. As part of the expanded case new communications have come to light, including an email from Steve Jobs to one executive, laying out that publishing company’s three options: 1) Join Apple. 2) Stick with Amazon. 3) Death by pirates! The digital kind, we assume—not the high-seas kind.

The Browser Wars Part Deux; Google Chrome Browser for iOS is Coming (Macquarie)

Is Google Chrome making its way to iOS? That’s what one analyst suggests. And doing so could kick off a new round of browser wars. Did we not learn after seeing all the carnage in Browser War I?!

Product News:

Squeeze 8.5 and Squeeze Pro 8.5 - Version 8.5 of Sorenson's video-encoding software improves encoding speed by an average of 200 percent over version 8. It also now comes with a free Sorenson 360 online account with 5GB of free, permanent storage. In addition, Squeeze users can throttle CPU encoding via a slide bar. Other improvements include manual timecode control, and new options for input and output. Squeeze 8.5 costs $799 and Squeeze Pro costs $999. For a limited time, upgrades are free for Squeeze 8 customers.

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