Clearing up Mountain Lion confusion

When Apple ships a new version of the Mac OS, it generally takes no more than 24 hours for the questions to come pouring in. Such is exactly the case with Mountain Lion. You have questions, I have answers.

I’m not happy with Safari 6. When I type in a web address and press Return, I’m taken to a Google search page rather than the site I want to visit.

First, be a bit more patient. If you type and immediately press Return you won’t see Safari’s list of results—one of which will likely be the website you want to visit. Instead, type the important bits of the address, wait for the list appear, and select the site from that list.

Next, know that once you visit such and such a site, it will appear as the top hit on the next go-round. That is, unless you’ve cleared Safari’s History or first accessed that site with private browsing switched on. In such cases Safari has no memory that you’ve visited that site and so won’t propose it as a top hit.

I’m not seeing Mail notifications. Do I have to have Mail running for such notifications to appear?

Yes you do.

What happened to the RSS feature in Safari 6?

It’s gone. When you now click on a feed link, Safari pops up an error suggesting that you visit the Mac App Store and download an RSS reader application. When you install an application such as NetNewsWire or Reeder and choose it as the default news reader, any feed links you click on will now open in that application.

There are (and will likely be more) alternatives. Red Sweater software’s Daniel Jalkut is working on a Safari extension that places an RSS button near the address bar. Click it and any feeds on a webpage open in your default RSS reader.

And I recently offered an Automator workflow that allows you to enter a feed address and have articles offered by that feed open in tabs within Safari.

I have a MacBook Air that should be compatible with Power Nap, but I don’t see the option in the Energy system preference.

On Wednesday afternoon Pacific time, Apple released a firmware update that brings that option to retina display MacBook Pros and 2011-and-later MacBook Airs. Select Software Update from the Apple menu. The update should be listed. (It’s also available to those running Lion.)

I have Tweetbot on my Mac and, oddly, its notifications appear in Notification center even though I've never opened it. I’ve configured my Gatekeeper settings so that I can open only applications purchased from the Mac App Store. When I click on a Tweetbot notification, I’m told that I can’t open it because I didn’t get it from the Mac App Store.

Huh, I'm not sure why you're seeing notifications from an application you haven't opened. As far as I know, that shouldn't happen. Still, upward and onward.

Your Mac is doing what it’s supposed to. You have a couple of options. You could locate the Tweetbot application, Control (right) click on it, choose Open, and you’ll be asked if you’re sure you want to open it. Click Open and it does. Gatekeeper asks you just a single time if you’d like to open an otherwise forbidden application. Once you do, you’ll never see that warning for that particular application again.

Or—and this is something niftyish that I just discovered—hold down the Option key and click on one of Tweetbot’s notifications. Tweetbot opens without any annoying “Are you sure?” dialog box. (And will continue to open without bugging you forever more.) I haven’t been able to confirm that this works with any unopened application that shoves notifications into Notification Center (nor, again, am I sure how those notifications got there in the first place if you haven't opened the application), but if it does, it’s a handy shortcut in such odd cases.

Do you have other Mountain Lion conundrums? Comments, ho!

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