Hands-on with Eventiles, the camera roll curation genius

Picture this: You’ve just synced some 1500 photos from your iPhone camera roll with iPhoto, and you suddenly realize that most people you know have never seen any of them.

The new sharing option is for people who are telling a universal story with their photos that may interest others in the community. 

That’s not going to change anytime soon—there’s just too much going on to sort through multiple photo shoots, decide on the best images, and then follow up with an album on Facebook, Flickr, or SmugMug. That means some really cool images (if you do say so yourself) sit in your phone for your private viewing pleasure instead of being seen by the world.

The folks behind Eventiles have been there, and have come up with an iPhone viewing and sharing app that does everything except shoot the photo for you.



Eventiles surveys all the images in your camera roll and decides which ones are the best to use for its signature collages. These are not necessarily the best shots, but the ones that will look best together to tell the story in your head.

The app builds collages automatically as it weeds out duplicates and sets titles based on the your photos' date, time, and location. So you may start with 1500 images mashed together and come out with sets of around 10 (more or less) unique shots from each photo session, arranged in a pleasing collage, complete with a title and ready to share. This action goes a long way in imparting a degree of organization to your photo collection.

Nothing is set in stone, just because Eventiles decides it. Each collage is a draft that you can leave as-is or override with your own choices and layout preferences.

Of course, Eventiles can be used to create a collage for any purpose, and you're free to tweak the program's first choices for the images that you want to use.

A new version, launching Monday (just in time to organize your weekend shots), steps up the sharing level a notch to focus more intently on storytellers and bloggers whose images might command a broader level of interest. For that, Eventiles adds a more sophisticated public timeline.

You can still share your collages privately via email, push notification, Twitter, or Facebook, of course. But if you opt to share your collage publically, it gets a unique embed code, which allows you to post it to your blog or another website outside of the Eventiles community.

And like most social networking photography apps, Eventiles lets you like and friend other community members, and comment on their work.

When you launch the app, Eventiles rips through your photos and does a fairly accurate job in putting images from the same shoot together, starting from the most recent date and working backward. I like how it suggests a headline for each collage, which will remind you of when and where the shots were taken and give you a starting point for renaming the set, if you want. It will not auto-rotate your photos, but uses them as-is. And it does not include any videos.

When you hit the Share button, everything gets posted in short order.

A set of five icons underneath each collage provide a range of basic options: you can trash, merge, or duplicate a collage, edit the headline, and add a description. You can also change the composition of the collage by moving images into a different order, and apply a special effect to the whole collage—think filters with names like Woodstock, Seattle, and Sapporo. Finally, you can share your collage via email, Facebook, Twitter, save it to its own album on your phone, or publish it to the public site where others can embed your collage in their own blogs or Facebook pages.

Eventiles is available on the iTunes Store for $2.

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