The Macalope: Still mad about something

His benefactor may be gone from ReadWrite, but the poster child for disgruntled former employees is still publishing his hate missives to Tim Cook there.

Yes, ReadWrite is still there for David “[sound of an axe being ground]” Sobotta, who says Apple’s Mac Pro ads are just another sign of blah blah doom blah blah blah.

“Coming To A Theater Near You: Apple’s Last Gasp At A Pro Computer” (no link, but tip o’ the antlers to the Jony Ive parody account on Twitter).

We now know it will come out this fall, according to the message that the clip closes with.

Is that too late, both for this model—and for the Mac Pro line? Could we be seeing the last gasp of Apple’s high-end desktop computers?

Oh, so now it’s a question? Strange, you seemed so sure in the title.

Unfortunately, Tim Cook’s team appears to believe the “idea” of the product is more important than the product itself.

Because the Mac Pro will never get here and will only ever exist as a concept, an image of a thing never meant to take physical form. Well, it’s possible. Who remembers the Palm Foleo?

The only good reason to announce a new version of a product that has had no significant form-factor update in 10 years and still doesn’t have a ship date …

Is that it has a significant form-factor update and highlights Apple’s industry-leading design skills?

… suggests that what matters here is Apple getting to talk about the Mac Pro—not customers actually getting their hands on one.

Uh, well, inasmuch as it’s not for sale yet, then, yes. Obviously, Apple doesn’t want to talk about the new iPhone because that would kill current iPhone sales. The lack of updates to the Mac Pro line has already sapped it of sales, so why not use the upcoming model to show off Apple’s design chops?

It’s not like this is the first time Apple’s ever highlighted an upcoming product that wasn’t yet for sale. Hmm, let’s see, how many months in advance did Apple unveil the iPhone? Oh, that’s right, the Macalope said as if he was just remembering it, it was six months.

It’s called marketing. You’d think someone who used to work in sales would know that, but apparently not.

I think Apple gave up on marketing desktop supercomputers when they moved from PowerPC chips to putting cookie-cutter Intel inside.

Yes, it really is, uh, damning that Apple … uh … switched from the PowerPC.

Could someone tell the Macalope what year it is, because this piece has him confused.

(Full disclosure: My still-functioning dual G5 system was purchased in December 2004. I paid $1,795 for it, but because it doesn’t have Intel chips, it’s stuck on OSX 10.3.9.)

Full disclosure: I’m emotionally and technologically stuck in 2004. Please send help.

Half in jest, I can only conclude that Apple hopes its remaining Mac Pro customers have oniomania, “a passion or insane desire to buy things.”

Ah! Well, half in jest is how we read ReadWrite, so that’s perfect.

When a person writes nothing but angry moans about the company he used to work for, it might be time to consider that there’s something other than analysis being conducted.

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