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Why the iPhone needs a 'panic button' now more than ever

Panic mode could give iPhone users a way to protect their data when the law fails to do so.

Should you be able to plead the Fifth if authorities order you to unlock your iPhone using Touch ID?

A judge in California has recently ruled that your fingerprint does not have the same Constitutional protections as your numeric passcode, so Touch ID-enabled iPhones are susceptible to search warrants. Thankfully, Apple is considering developing a new way to protect our iPhones using Touch ID.

In this week’s iPhone Show, we look into an Apple patent that would give iPhones a new “panic mode” to lock out personal information or reset the device entirely. You’d be able to designate a certain finger for Touch ID to secretly trigger panic mode.

In this day and age of ever-changing privacy protections and the government’s recent fascination with iPhone-hacking, a panic mode could serve as a defense mechanism against self-incrimination. Because this is America, and Siri should have the right to remain silent, too.

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