Rich MogullContributor, Macworld

Rich Mogull is a security analyst at Securosis. He's the security editor at TidBits and has been covering security for 20 years.

Protect your privacy: social networking

macworld.com

Maintaining privacy on social networks is much like hanging all your dirty laundry on a highway billboard, then asking only your friends to look. While it's possible to avoid sharing your life's story with the entire world, it takes effort.

Protect your privacy: Web browsing

macworld.com

Ad networks, search engines, Internet service providers, and social networks all track, analyze, and sell almost everything you do online.

Protect your privacy: what happens to your data?

When criminals obtain your e-mail address, credit card, or Social Security Number, your information enters an underground economy where it’s sold, bought, and (maybe) eventually used in a crime.

Protect your privacy: browse the Web safely

When you browse the Web, it’s like you’ve allowed a bunch of companies to implant a tracking device in your arm and a small camera in your head, recording where you go and what you look at. Thanks to ad networks, search engines, ISPs, and social networks, your online activities are tracked, analyzed, and sold.

Protect your privacy: take control of social networking

Maintaining privacy on social networks is much like hanging all your dirty laundry on a highway billboard—and then asking only your friends to look. While it's possible to avoid sharing your life's story with the entire world, it takes a lot of effort and is often contrary to the goals of the services you use. Remember, these services are free because they’re selling access to you.

Protect your privacy: keep your data safe

In the old days, you probably kept all of your private data on your Mac. Today, your information is most likely stored across multiple Macs, iOS devices, and cloud-based storage services. Fortunately, there are tools that can keep your data safe, no matter where it lies.

monster gremlin bug

Adobe Acrobat X: Do you feel safe yet?

Despite Acrobat's vulnerabilities, and its exploitation on Windows, the risk to Mac users today is immeasurably low. We just aren't seeing the attacks, says security expert Rich Mogull.