Lion "nothing but win" for Mac users

Apple's new OS for the App Store era borrows iPad usability tweaks while delivering key new features for businesses and professionals

Eight easy steps to iPhone security

As someone who's been around the block a few times with mobile technology, I get a kick out of lengthy treatises on the...

Opinion: Parallels Server for Mac underwhelms

InfoWorld’s Tom Yager weighs in on Parallels Server for Mac, the virtualization product that opens Xserve and Mac Pro to 64-bit heterogeneous environments.

Leopard Server: The people's UNIX

Tom Yager looks at Mac OS X v10.5 Server, and approves.

Opinion: Jobs' ideal iPhone app won't run on an iPhone

InfoWorld's Tom Yager assesses at Apple's decision to let developers build iPhone apps using AJAX and other Web 2.0 technologies.

Opinion: Apple II turns 30

Thirty years ago, Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs unveiled the Apple II at the West Coast Computer Faire.

Will Leopard get buried by Vista buzz?

Mac OS X Leopard could face some stiff competition from Windows Vista capturing the eye of the press.

Opinion: An Apple for the enterprise?

With Apple having switched its entire Mac line to Intel microprocessors and 64-bit computing gaining traction, Tom Yager says the time is right for enterprise IT managers to look at Apple -- and offers some responses to the typical reasons why Macs are rejected.

Opinion: Why Apple snubs its open source geeks

Tom Yager finds Apple's excuses lacking for why it hasn't made an open version of its OS X kernel source code for Intel-based Macs.

Opinion: Apple closes down OS X

Tom Yager notes that Apple doesn't make available an open version of Darwin for Intel-based Macs.

Opinion: Dude, you're getting a Mac!

Tom Yager offers his opinion on Apple’s move to Intel and his hopes for the future of Apple’s server business.

Tiger purrs for developers and IT

Tiger — Mac OS X 10.4 — marks a turning point in the evolution of the Mac platform. The numerous enhancements to Mac OS X 10.4 and Mac OS X Server 10.4 are clearly aimed at the broad base of IT and professional users, rather than niches with spillover into offices and datacenters. This is the enterprise OS that Apple’s IT customers and developers thought they’d get when Xserve G5 shipped.

Apple and IBM Power ahead together

The Power5 hasn't yet arrived in an Apple machine, despite the similarly named PowerPC G5, the Mac's latest, greatest CPU. Apple's G5 is actually based on the Power4 -- except with a single core, a smaller die, less heat, and lower power consumption.

IBM's Power5 worth a second look

If all things were equal and IBM Corp. made its systems as accessible as Dell Inc. and Hewlett-Packard Co. do theirs, the IBM Power5 processor could bury Intel Corp.'s Itanium 2. First introduced last summer, the Power5 is a one-two punch, a triumph of engineering from a company that excels not only in processor design but also in the submicron science of chip manufacturing and packaging.