Print an app list and control iTunes from the menu bar

Kirk McElhearn Senior Contributor, Macworld

Senior contributor Kirk McElhearn (@mcelhearn) writes The iTunes Guy column and about Macs, music, and more on his blog Kirkville. He's also the author of Take Control of iTunes 10: The FAQ.
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In this first column of 2014, I address how to get a list of apps on an iOS device, show some tagging tricks for multidisc sets, and offer suggestions for iTunes controllers.

Q: Like many of us, I expect, I have a lot of apps in my iTunes library that I no longer need. I’d like to clean them out so I don’t waste time, disk space, and bandwidth updating them, and cut down on clutter and confusion. I have two iOS devices, and would like to know of a method to get a list of the apps on each, combine the lists, and toss out anything not on them. Do you have any suggestions for an easy way to do this?

You can see all the apps installed on a given iOS device in Settings > General > Usage, but I don’t think that’s what you want. I can think of two ways to get a list to determine which apps you can delete. The first is to back up your iOS devices; if you have them set to back up to iCloud, you need to do a backup to your Mac. Next choose Go > Go to Folder in the Finder and enter ~/Library/Application Support/MobileSync/Backup. In that folder you’ll see other folders with long alphanumeric names; there should be one for each of your iOS devices. Look for an info.plist file inside one of these folders.

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Find missing ringtones, understand the mysterious 'Other' on iOS devices, and print album lists

Kirk McElhearn Senior Contributor, Macworld

Senior contributor Kirk McElhearn (@mcelhearn) writes The iTunes Guy column and about Macs, music, and more on his blog Kirkville. He's also the author of Take Control of iTunes 10: The FAQ.
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It’s the holiday season, and many of you may have new Macs, new iOS devices, or new content to add to your iTunes library. This week, I look at questions about poster art for movies, printing a list of albums, and the infamous “Other” content on iOS devices.

Q: I buy movies and download the digital copies into iTunes and normally it runs smoothly. However, I have a couple of movies that don’t show the poster in iTunes. I tried right-clicking and downloading artwork but that didn’t work. Any ideas on how to fix it?

As far as I know, the Get Album Artwork menu item you’re talking about only works with music. For movies, you need to find your own cover art.

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Move your iTunes library to another user and search the iTunes Store efficiently

Kirk McElhearn Senior Contributor, Macworld

Senior contributor Kirk McElhearn (@mcelhearn) writes The iTunes Guy column and about Macs, music, and more on his blog Kirkville. He's also the author of Take Control of iTunes 10: The FAQ.
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It’s time for another grab-bag column, with a number of interesting questions I’ve gotten from readers recently. I look at whether or not you can get around Apple’s limit of 25,000 songs with iTunes Match, I discuss some ways to search the iTunes Store more efficiently, and I look at a question whose answer requires a smart playlist.

Q: I am currently using iTunes Match, and am maxed out on songs. Is it possible to add music to my iTunes library without it being added to iTunes Match? I would like to keep iTunes Match active but would also like to add more music to my library.

The short answer is no. iTunes Match’s 25,000 song limit is an issue for many users, myself included. I discussed this in an article last year, iTunes Match: One year in.

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Tote around your iTunes library and more on iBooks

Kirk McElhearn Senior Contributor, Macworld

Senior contributor Kirk McElhearn (@mcelhearn) writes The iTunes Guy column and about Macs, music, and more on his blog Kirkville. He's also the author of Take Control of iTunes 10: The FAQ.
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Following my last column, which focused on the new iBooks app, I’ve gotten several more questions about iBooks, and I answer two of them here. I also look at a tricky question about moving the contents of an iTunes library back and forth between two Macs, and answer a question about a smart playlist with nested conditions.

Q: When I updated to Mavericks and my books were transferred out of iTunes, some of my digital booklets (album liner notes) made the trip to iBooks and some didn’t. I was able to drag them out of iTunes to iBooks, but not vice-versa. Newly purchased digital booklets stay in iTunes unless I move them. Is there any rhyme or reason to this behavior? Is there a way to get them back into iTunes if I want them there?

It should depend on whether they were in your Books library or your Music library. In my case, those in the Music library—which is where they go when you buy them through iTunes—stayed in iTunes.

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Of iTunes and iBooks

Kirk McElhearn Senior Contributor, Macworld

Senior contributor Kirk McElhearn (@mcelhearn) writes The iTunes Guy column and about Macs, music, and more on his blog Kirkville. He's also the author of Take Control of iTunes 10: The FAQ.
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Since the release of OS X Mavericks, I’ve gotten a lot of questions about ebooks and iTunes. I address three of these in this week’s column. I also look at a question about smart playlists with nested conditions, and a way to keep Christmas music from coming up in shuffle mode on an iPod.

Q: Since I’ve upgraded to OS X 10.9 Mavericks, I notice that iTunes no longer has a Books section; all the books have moved to iBooks. Under this new scheme, how do I sync books to my iPhone or iPad?

You’re correct that since Mavericks has an iBooks app, you’ll find that iTunes no longer stores your books. The first time you select the Books library in iTunes, the app will offer to take you to iBooks, which will then import your books. It will not, however, move your audiobooks; these stay in iTunes, and the Books library gets renamed Audiobooks.

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Your tricky iTunes questions answered

Kirk McElhearn Senior Contributor, Macworld

Senior contributor Kirk McElhearn (@mcelhearn) writes The iTunes Guy column and about Macs, music, and more on his blog Kirkville. He's also the author of Take Control of iTunes 10: The FAQ.
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I’ve been getting a lot of interesting, if obscure, questions lately, including one—regarding adding album art to high-resolution AIFF files—that took me a while to solve. In this week’s column, I share that tale; discuss duplicating just the music part of an iTunes library; and tell you how to find your podcast playlists in the iOS Podcasts app.

Q: Is there a way to sort music on an iPod classic by date added?

No, you can’t actually sort the music on the iPod in that way, but you can create a smart playlist in iTunes that will let you view it by date added, and sync the playlist to the iPod.

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Deal with WAV files and combine random tracks into albums

Kirk McElhearn Senior Contributor, Macworld

Senior contributor Kirk McElhearn (@mcelhearn) writes The iTunes Guy column and about Macs, music, and more on his blog Kirkville. He's also the author of Take Control of iTunes 10: The FAQ.
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In a grab-bag column this week, I answer some questions about tagging a bunch of singles as an album, and I discuss tagging WAV files in iTunes. I also take on the HD-versus-SD debate—as in, is it worthwhile to pay more for HD video content?

Q: I’ve got a number of singles that are tagged individually, but I’d also like to group them as an album. I don’t want to make a playlist, but I do want them to show as an album in all views in iTunes. How can I do this?

You can’t tag the same songs in two ways, so what you need to do is duplicate the tracks. Start by making a new folder on your desktop. In iTunes, select the tracks you want to “albumize,” and then drag them to that new folder to copy the tracks.

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