iOS

The lazy man's guide to streaming iTunes movies to your iPad

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Paul Inglis is interested in transferring media wirelessly to his iPad. He writes:

Okay, I’m lazy. But my Mac is upstairs and I’m downstairs on the couch with my iPad where I want to watch a movie. What’s the best way for me to do that without having to plug my iPad into my Mac and sync the movie using iTunes?

Never fear, Apple designed this stuff with you in mind. You have a couple of options.

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Dealing with iCloud spam

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Rich Girrard is less than thrilled by what’s appearing in his Inbox. He writes:

I’m not sure why, but in the last couple of days I’ve received several spam messages via my iCloud account. The messages are so obviously spam I don’t know why Apple hasn’t caught them. I know I can delete the messages, but is there anything I can do to let Apple know about this stuff?

You’re not alone. I, and many people I know, have been hit by this wave. Fortunately you have some recourse.

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Saving documents to your Mac rather than iCloud

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader M. Burns asks about an issue that has puzzled more than one Mountain Lion user. He writes:

I’m running Mountain Lion on my MacBook Pro and using Pages. Since upgrading to Mountain Lion, Pages defaults to saving files to iCloud. I’d prefer that those files are saved to my Mac. Yet, even after choosing that option in the Save dialog box, the next time I save, iCloud appears again as the default location. Is there any way to convince Pages to always save files to my Mac?

There is, but the method I’m about to describe affects all applications that save, by default, to iCloud. (They include Pages, Numbers, Keynote, TextEdit, and Preview.) Just do this:

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iOS

Bugs & Fixes: Back up to avoid iPhone disasters

Ted Landau Senior Contributor, Macworld

Much too often, I get a phone call with a plea for help that goes something like this recent one:

I dropped my iPhone and now it’s broken. I can’t get to the Home screen or launch apps or anything. I took the phone to an Apple Store and they said the phone can’t be repaired. I need to get a replacement phone. But that means I will lose all the stuff that’s on the iPhone now, including over a thousand photos. Isn’t there something I can do to save my stuff?

After asking the person a few questions, I confirm what I had already suspected. There is very little hope of data recovery. Certainly there’s not any fast and easy solution. Which is too bad, because it could have been soooo simple.

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How to delete duplicate email messages

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Susan Swartz has tired of reading the same messages over and over. She writes:

What’s the current best way to find duplicate mail messages?

Great question. Let me rephrase it so that the answer is more helpful:

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Cleaning up an ebook library with Calibre

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Susan Erich seeks a bit of organization in her literature. She writes:

I’ve downloaded hundreds of free ebooks in a variety of formats and I need help organizing them. Some, I guess, are meant for a Kindle and others can be read on my iPad. I think there are duplicate titles and some of the author information is incorrect. Is there an easy way to sort these things out?

I was completely with you until you mentioned “easy.” Separating ebook types is a cinch, locating and deleting duplicates isn’t terribly difficult, but when you talk about tidying up title and author information (which relies on the book’s metadata) you could be looking at a long and tedious process. But let’s hope for the best and run through the steps.

Removing duplicates: Let’s get rid of your duplicates. To do that choose Calibre > Preferences and then click Plugins in the resulting sheet. In the next sheet click Get New Plugins. In the list that appears locate Find Duplicates, select it, and click Install. Then quit and restart Calibre.

Selecting Fuzzy gives you the best chance of finding the greatest number of duplicate ebooks.

Once restarted, Calibre will display a Find Duplicates entry in the toolbar. Click on it and in the window that appears choose Fuzzy under both the Title Matching and Author Matching headings and click OK. A list of books that are duplicated will appear. Command-click any additional copies of the book (leave one unchecked so that you don’t delete the original) and then click on Remove Books in the toolbar. The duplicates will disappear.

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In case of emergency: Creating the bootable iPod classic

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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In a recent Macworld Podcast, I mentioned that it was possible to use an old iPod classic as a bootable drive for emergency troubleshooting use. Reader Kirk Aplin followed up for details. He writes:

I was intrigued by your tip for using old iPods in this week’s Macworld podcast. Have you written exactly how to do that somewhere?

Not in many years. It’s a technique I routinely showed off in the pre-iOS days when giving one of my “iPod Tips and Tricks” sessions. The gist is that a bootable iPod can be a very helpful tool when your Mac is refusing to start up or is generally misbehaving, and you’d like to boot it from another drive and use troubleshooting tools on the iPod to diagnose (and, you hope, repair) your Mac.

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