How to disable unconfirmed contact email suggestions

Henry Crun is fed up with suggestions. He writes:

How can I get rid of all the email addresses iOS has collected and insists on offering up when i’m trying to select something? Personally, I only want iOS to offer addresses that are listed in my Contacts app. i can see some wanting more but what iOS currently offers is the kitchen sink.

If you toggle off Contacts in Mail in Settings, Apple claims it’ll delete any unconfirmed contacts. But “unconfirmed” by whom? Apparently not by me, because it’s off and yet all those unwanted contacts still show.

Henry also finds that if he sets up an iOS device from scratch, iCloud syncs all those addresses, too.

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How to delete items instantly or selectively from Trash

Reader Len writes:

I frequently use flash drives for backup and to transfer files from one computer to another. I often want to delete one or two files from a flash drive without emptying the trash. Is there any way to do this?

Starting in El Capitan, you’ve got an option for precisely this purpose. While I don’t use the Trash as a temporary repository—a kind of purgatory between an active file and the final bit bucket in the sky—but rather only for items I want to get rid of, many people I know stow stuff in Trash they think they might delete later.

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How does Photos manage media on an iOS device?

Reader Steven Alford asks:

When I click on a single photo on, say, my iPad, a small clock face rotates in the lower righthand corner and the photo is displayed. Is that photo downloaded to my device and does it take up room on the device? Or, are only photos taken by the device stored on the device?

If you’re using iCloud Photo Library, you can set synchronization such that Photos in iOS and OS X only caches thumbnail previews of images. (In iOS: Settings > Photos & Camera and set Optimize iPhone/iPad Storage. In Photos for OS X: Preferences > iCloud, and set Optimize Mac Storage.)

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How to fix typing two capitals in a row at a word’s start

Mark Weinrib asks about a typical typo:

I am trying to find out how to autocorrect double-letter capitalizations. For example, if I spell office “OFfice” I want to automatically make the F into a lowercase f. Microsoft Office has a setting for this. I can not find one in OS X, so when I am in Mail or` in TextEdit it doesn’t autocorrect.

OS X does offer this setting system-wide as part of automatic spelling correction, and it works in all of Apple’s programs and is available in other apps that take advantage of it. This autocorrect will drop in what OS X thinks is the “correct” replacement as you type—it may sometimes be the wrong one if you’re using a specialized term or a special spelling. Generally, it’s the right choice.

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Does your photo have the wrong timestamp? Here's how to fix it

Lee Perrin writes in with a temporal dilemma in Yosemite:

Recently, I took a vacation to Alaska. I used my iPhone, which reset to the local time, and a point-and-shoot camera that I forgot was still set to EDT. After importing the photos to my Mac, I’ve found the time sequences are wrong and the photos are in the wrong order because of the differences in the two cameras settings. How can I edit the wrong times?

You’re in luck, as there are multiple ways to fix this.

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How to remove app purchases from iTunes

Kathy writes in with a problem and a request:

In my history, I see apps I did not install nor do I think are on any device we own. Can I know which device they were supposedly installed on and how can I erase them on my purchases?

For the first, it’s hard to know. Apps associated with an iTunes account should only appear there if they were obtained for free or purchased. It’s definitely possible that you or someone in your family selected apps by unintentionally clicking, or the apps are from so far in the past, you forgot you ever bought them. I have apps on my account that are seven years old, and I have no recollection of ever interacting with it.

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What to do when Firefox won't quit, and does Apple read crash feedback?

Frederic Ze asks an existential question about the nature of Apple’s feedback systems:

Almost consistently each time I want to quit Firefox it fails to do so. I have to use the Command-Option-Escape technique to force it to quit. Following this I would be prompted to Inform Apple, which I of course do, but I wonder what good that process really does. Sometimes if I let it “hesitate” for up to a minute it will finally quit.

I used to use Firefox, and finally gave up on because it has serious memory leak issues in OS X, even this many years under development. What that means is that after using the browser for minutes to hours, it would eat up system resources, become non-responsive, and often require me to force quit, as you’ve had to do. With one release maybe a year or two ago, I had to force quit every time, though that problem went away.

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