Bugs & Fixes: DiskWarrior to the rescue

Ted Landau Senior Contributor, Macworld

Alsoft's DiskWarrior is a disk repair utility. Plain and simple. But don't dismiss it as a one-trick pony. When you have a hard drive that otherwise seems beyond repair, this is the utility you want to have. While I have been making this recommendation almost since DiskWarrior debuted back in 1998, a recent incident confirmed that it is just as true today.

In truth, I have had little use for any disk repair utility over the past several years. I certainly hadn't used DiskWarrior. Based on my anecdotal experience, drives and system software are more reliable now than they were years ago. Whereas I could expect to need a disk repair utility at least several times a year back in the 1990's, problems with my drives almost never happen now. Further, if I do need help, I typically start with the First Aid component of Apple's Disk Utility. It has the convenience of being accessible from the Recovery HD partition built-in to recent Macs, helpful for making repairs to a primary startup disk. And First Aid is usually capable of fixing whatever is ailing my drive. If it can't, it typically means either the drive needs to be reformatted or it has a hardware problem and needs to be replaced. End of story.

"So who needs DiskWarrior anymore?" I found myself asking. I found out the answer when the startup drive in my 2009 Mac Pro inexplicably developed a bizarre symptom a few weeks ago. After a system-wide freeze forced me to do a hard restart, I could no longer get my Mac to boot. About 10 seconds after the Apple logo appeared, the Mac shut itself off. And I do mean off. It wasn't merely that the display went black or that the Mac went to sleep. Rather, the Mac powered off just as if I had selected Shut Down. This continued to happen with each restart. It didn't matter if I started up normally or via a Safe Boot.

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Resetting Safari with a keyboard shortcut

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader John Craven offers up this head-scratcher. He writes:

A short while ago I found a keyboard shortcut to reset Safari. Then recently I was having trouble with Safari and the keyboard shortcut stopped working along with a few other problems. I took my Mac to the Genius Bar and the technician showed me how to delete the plist file. This brought everything back to normal. The problem is I can’t remember the keyboard shortcut to reset Safari anymore.

If you remember, please let me know because I’ve never heard of such a shortcut. Oh sure, you can open Safari’s preferences (Command-comma), click the Advanced tab, enable the Show Develop Menu in Menu Bar option, and then press Command-Option-E to empty Safari’s caches, but that’s not the same thing as resetting the browser.

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How to prevent your iOS device from listening in

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Steffie L is concerned not about what her iOS devices sees, but rather what it hears. She writes:

With more and more apps listening in at all times on your iOS device (Shazam, etc), short of deleting the app is there any way to control when this happens?

Under iOS 7, yes. One of the features introduced with this version of iOS was the ability to limit apps’ access to the device’s microphone. When you first launch an app that wants to use the mic, you’ll see a dialog box asking if you’re willing to let the app do this. Tap on OK and it now has the access it desires.

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How to drag items to your hard drive without being challenged for a password

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Terry Bone is bone-tired of entering her password when attempting to move a file to her hard drive. She writes:

I just got a new MacBook Pro with Mavericks and noticed that now if I want to drag a file onto the hard drive I have to type my password and type it again if I want to remove it. I do this frequently in order to make files available to transfer online to a PC. Is there a way to turn that off so I can transfer files in and out of the hard drive without the additional step of entering a password?

First, some background. With Mac OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion) and later, Apple made the startup drive system-owned. You can see this in action by selecting your startup drive in the Finder, pressing Command-I, and then gandering down at the bottom of the resulting Info window (in the Sharing & Permissions area). You’ll see that the first entry is system followed by wheel and then everyone. system has Read & Write permissions while wheel and everyone are marked Read Only. Navigate to the Documents folder inside your user folder, perform this same Command-I trick, and your name will appear as the top entry in this area and you’ll have Read & Write permissions.

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How to batch rename files for free

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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A reader who wishes to remain anonymous would prefer to forego some busy work. He writes:

I’ve been working on a project for a couple of months where I created a few hundred files using this naming format: 1.1 My File Name.txt. I’ve just been told that I have to use a different format: 1_1_my_file_name.txt because of how the files are tracked in the company’s database. I don’t want to do this by hand. Do you have any tips for speeding up the process?

If you’re willing to cough up $20, Publicspace.net offers a great solution in the form of A Better Finder Rename. If you need to do this kind of thing routinely, it’s worth the money.

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How to print captions with your iPhoto images

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Delores Rice will soon be digging deeper into her Applications folder. She writes:

I need a program that will allow me to import a group of photos—maybe four to a page—type captions for each, and then print. Seems simple but I haven’t been able to use my existing programs. Can you advise on this?

There’s a good chance that you already have a copy of the application you seek: iPhoto ’11. Like so.

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iOS

Scheduling recurring events on iOS

Dan Moren Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan has been writing about all things Apple since 2006, when he first started contributing to the MacUser blog. Since then he's covered most of the company's major product releases and reviewed every major revision of iOS. In his "copious" free time, he's usually grinding away on a novel or two.
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Reader Diane Williams has a recurring question:

I’m trying to schedule a recurring meeting that occurs each month on the first Thursday of the month. Could not manage to do this in Calendar. The repeat function for monthly meetings operates by date, not by day of the month. Am I missing something?

scheduling calendar osx

Calendar on the Mac has plenty of recurring options that are lacking on iOS.

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