How to extract audio from a Blu-ray disc

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Derrick Crandall has one chunk of media that he’d like to turn into more. He writes:

I have a concert recording on a Blu-ray disc. I’d like to use my Mac to extract the audio from it so I can play its music on my devices but I haven’t any idea where to start. What do you suggest?

To do this, you’ll need both hardware and software that you may not currently have. You’ll also need this admonition:

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Copying address lists from Excel into Apple's Mail

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Benjamin Peacock confronts an issue regarding the intersection of Excel and Mail. He writes:

I have an Excel spreadsheet that contains a list of email addresses. Before Mavericks, I could create an email message that used all these addresses simply by copying the cells and pasting them into a message’s To field. With Mavericks’ Mail the necessary comma is missing between each address when I paste them in. Without the commas I can’t send the message because I’m told the addresses aren’t formatted correctly. Is there a way to fix this?

There is, and it’s all done within Excel. For the sake of our example, let’s say that all your addresses are in Column A, beginning with the A1 cell. Within this very article copy this bit of text—=A1&","—click in the B1 cell, and choose Edit > Paste Special. In the Paste Special window that appears leave Unicode Text selected and click OK. The address in A1 will now appear in B1, but be followed by a comma—bubba@example.com,—for example.

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Importing Windows Outlook messages into Apple's Mail

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Lowell Brown contacted me on Twitter with the idea of helping a kinsperson with their email. He tweets:

I’m going to help a family member move from a PC to a new Mac. How can we convert Outlook .pst archives to a format compatible with Apple’s Mail?

Microsoft uses the PST (Personal Storage Table) file format for Outlook’s messages and events. Although the format is accessible to Outlook for Mac, Apple’s Mail won’t deal with such archives. Therefore you have to convert them.

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How to share iWork '13 files with iOS devices

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Nathan Bach is confounded by Keynote. He writes:

I use Google Drive to share files with friends and colleagues. I recently started using the latest versions of iWork on both my Mac and iPad and I’ve been told that others can’t open my Keynote presentations on their iOS devices. I tested it and, sure enough, when I try to open the file in the Google Drive app on my iPad, it appears as a folder. How do people manage to share these files?

When Apple changed the iWork file format so that Pages, Numbers, and Keynote documents are saved as packages rather than a single file it thought very much about iCloud and very little about sharing these files with cloud-based services such as Google Drive. Google Drive is simply reporting what it sees—a folder full of files, none of which is the full Keynote presentation. Indirect though they may be, there are a couple of things you can do about this (I mean other than complain to Apple).

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How to gain easy access to your iPhone's most important mail

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Catherine Yee would like easier access to her email. She writes:

Is there a way to make an alias of a mailbox on my iPhone and put it on the home screen so I can access that mailbox more easily? I sometimes need to look back at email I’ve sent and I hate digging through mailboxes within the Mail app to find it.

I like the way you think. It would be great if, like web clippings, you could place aliases of mailboxes on an iOS device’s home screen. But I’m afraid the answer to this one is “Not possible.”

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Slim down your SSD with symbolic links

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Reader Josh Gillam loves the speed of his SSD but not its capacity. He writes:

Late last year you wrote about speeding up an old Mac with an SSD. I followed your advice by replacing the media drive in my MacBook Pro with an SSD, leaving the original hard drive for other things. The problem I face now is that my SSD fills up quickly. Is there a way I can better manage its storage so files are stored by default on the old hard drive rather than the SSD?

Absolutely. There are a couple of ways you can go about this. If you find that a lot of the storage is being used by iPhoto and iTunes, you can simply shift their files over to the old hard drive and then point the apps to look there for their resources.

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Bugs & Fixes: Slow Wi-Fi reconnect after MacBook wakes up

Ted Landau Senior Contributor, Macworld

Many Mavericks users report that their MacBooks take an irritatingly long time to reconnect to their local Wi-Fi network after waking from sleep. While this symptom had been occasionally reported prior to Mavericks, there has been a resurgence of complaints following the release of OS X 10.9. Something new seems to be at fault.

I am one of the users who have this symptom. In my case (13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display), the length of the delay varies. Sometimes it’s just a few seconds longer than I would otherwise expect. At other times, it can take a few minutes before I’m back online.

When I initially check the Wi-Fi menu while waiting for a reconnect, no network names appear. After a while, my previously connected network—as well as any other nearby networks—eventually do show up. A successful reconnect typically occurs shortly thereafter.

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