Why Mavericks' movies may not preview properly

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
More by

Reader Arlen Andrews has a concern about his movie files. He writes:

I recently upgraded to Mavericks and now when I attempt to preview a movie file I see only a window telling me that the movie is zero KB in size, which I know isn’t true. When I double-click on the movie, it opens in QuickTime Player X but then immediately converts. What’s going on?

This appears to be another under-the-hood change designed so that the Mac OS better mimics the iOS. If you have one, find a movie file that ends with .m4v. Dollars-to-doughnuts, if you select that file and press the space bar, Quick Look will behave exactly as it should and show you the movie. Now try it again with one of your .mov files. No dice, right?

Read more »

23

Easily add movies from one Mac to another Mac's iTunes library

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
More by

Reader James Edlund is a movie maven with a mission. He writes:

I’d like to convert my DVD movies to digital form and then play them from the Mac mini connected to my TV. The problem I have is that the Mac I use to rip DVDs is in my office and the mini (which lacks a DVD drive) is in the family room. Is there some way to easily move these movies from one place to the other over the network?

It’s a reasonably simple thing to do. First, configure your Mac mini so that you can share files with it. Do this by launching its copy of System Preferences, select the Sharing preference, and enable File Sharing. On that same Mac launch iTunes and keep it running for the rest of that Mac’s natural life.

Read more »

7

Bugs & Fixes: Solve scanning problems via HP’s hidden settings

Ted Landau Senior Contributor, Macworld

If you have a Hewlett-Packard all-in-one (AIO) printer, and you’re having trouble getting some of its scanning features to work, take heart. HP’s printing software offers a collection of settings that will likely provide the solution. The only problem is that HP keeps these settings so hidden that even some of their tech support employees don’t know about them.

I first became aware of these settings when I was unable to resolve a scanning failure with my Hewlett-Packard OfficeJet 8600 Pro. I had no trouble initiating a scan from software on my Mac. In fact, there are multiple ways to do this. HP’s printer software includes two separate scanning utilities, Scanner and HP Scan. The former is accessed from the printer’s Print Queue or the Print & Scan System Preferences pane; the latter is found in the Applications folder. Additionally, OS X provides Image Capture. These all get the job done.

However, I was more interested in initiating scans from the printer itself. Doing this comes in handy when scanning material, such as pages from a magazine, where it is more convenient to stand by the scanner (to turn pages and hold down the material) rather than sit by the Mac.

Read more »

11

Moving ebooks from Mac to Kindle

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
More by

Reader Enid Hartman has recently obtained her first ebook reader and has a question. She writes:

I recently purchased Amazon’s latest Kindle Paperwhite. It’s my first Kindle and I’m really excited about putting ebooks on it. I’ve visited Project Gutenburg and downloaded some Kindle-compatible ebooks but I can’t figure out how to transfer them to my Kindle. What’s the secret?

Bundled with your Kindle is a USB cable (regrettably these new Paperwhites don’t additionally include a charger, though you can use your computer’s USB port or an iOS device’s charger). String this cable between your Mac and the Kindle. In short order you’ll see a Kindle volume mount on your Mac’s desktop. (If you don’t see it, choose Finder > Preferences > General and enable the External Disks option.)

Read more »

6

The case of the missing Apple TV movies

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
More by

A reader who wishes to remain anonymous believes he has lost something he deeply values. He writes:

After a recent update I switched on my Apple TV prepared to watch a movie I’d ripped from a DVD I own. It—and other movies I’ve ripped—are gone! What happened to them?

With the latest iTunes and Apple TV, Apple categorizes such movies (any variety of video that wasn’t obtained from the iTunes Store) as home videos. When you select Computers on your Apple TV you will see an entry for Home Videos as the fourth item in the media list. If you select that item and then click the remote’s Select button, all your ripped movies should appear.

Read more »

8

iOS

Nancy Solomon and the terrible, horrible, no good, very bad Calendar

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
More by

Reader Nancy Solomon is not the first person I’ve heard complain about the size of iOS 7’s text or the way the Calendar app is put together. She writes:

I have an iPad mini and have upgraded to iOS 7. I have a question about the Calendar app. When I select an event in Day view, the background color darkens and the type turns to white, which makes it hard to read the event’s title. I have light colors for all my calendars, and this makes me crazy. Would it be easier to read if I make the print bigger? Or do I need to make the calendar colors darker?

Honestly, neither is much of an option. Allow me to explain why.

Read more »

41

iOS

How to set up a FaceTime 'picture phone'

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
More by

Reader Bob Kadarauch isn’t interested in a do-it-all device. He writes:

Does anyone manufacture hardware specifically, and only, for using FaceTime? I want to give my 90-year-old mother a “picture phone.” If I tell her it’s a computer, she won’t use it!

If you specifically want to use FaceTime, you’ll have to employ some kind of Apple device. And, as you’re likely aware, Apple devices aren’t one-trick ponies. So the short answer is “no.” The longer answer goes a little something like this.

Read more »

9