You can't handle the truth

The Macalope , Macworld

In addition to being a mythical beast, the Macalope is not an employee of Macworld. As a result, the Macalope is always free to criticize any media organization. Even ours.
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Another week means yet another pundit’s here to lay down some truths about what Steve Jobs would think about Apple under Tim Cook.

Writing for The Daily Beast, Marlow Stern details the ugliness.

“Tim Cook’s Apple: Middling Products Designed to Pad the Bottom Line While Gouging Loyal Customers” (tip o’ the antlers to Jack Brewster).

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All out of ideas

The Macalope , Macworld

In addition to being a mythical beast, the Macalope is not an employee of Macworld. As a result, the Macalope is always free to criticize any media organization. Even ours.
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This week, the Macalope asks you to ponder this question: Who’s really out of ideas? Is it Apple, or the people who write about Apple?

(Hint: the latter.)

Faster, pussycat! Innovate! Innovate!

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15

One side fits all

The Macalope , Macworld

In addition to being a mythical beast, the Macalope is not an employee of Macworld. As a result, the Macalope is always free to criticize any media organization. Even ours.
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They say that one-sided comparisons are what makes Internet punditry go ‘round. Well, the Macalope says that.

Writing for the Motley Fool, Ishfaque Faruk says “Amazon.com, Inc. is Taking on Apple” (no link because this is sooo tiresome).

Jeff Bezos would like you to think he is, anyway.

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Our go-to guy

The Macalope , Macworld

In addition to being a mythical beast, the Macalope is not an employee of Macworld. As a result, the Macalope is always free to criticize any media organization. Even ours.
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Amazon announced the Fire Phone last week, and who would you turn to for analysis on what this means for Apple other than Rob Enderle?

No, really, who? Because whoever it is has got to be better. Even Jeff Bezos might give more subtle and nuanced analysis.

“How Amazon’s Fire Phone Will Beat the iPhone in 3 Years” (no link naturally, but tip o’ the antlers to The LeeBase).

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12

Paling in comparison

The Macalope , Macworld

In addition to being a mythical beast, the Macalope is not an employee of Macworld. As a result, the Macalope is always free to criticize any media organization. Even ours.
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No, these are not instances of one thing paling in comparison to another. Instead, these are instances of pundits themselves making comparisons that never should have been made. Android security is just as good as iOS’s? The Amazon phone will destroy the iPhone and the iWatch? Come on, folks.

One of these things is not like the other

Hey, kids! Who likes ridiculous exercises in false equivalency?! Why, everyone, of course!

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11

Won't somebody think of the children?

The Macalope , Macworld

In addition to being a mythical beast, the Macalope is not an employee of Macworld. As a result, the Macalope is always free to criticize any media organization. Even ours.
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The Macalope finally feels that he’s dug himself out from under the avalanche of post-WWDC dumb enough to devote some time to something else. There are other, more important things in life than software development conferences, you know.

Like how iOS-based devices are the root of all evil and are corrupting our children even as we speak.

Yes, our fine friends at Australia’s The Age (disclaimer: not actually friends) are back with another opinion piece on how Apple is ruining everything.

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18

The two-headed coin

The Macalope , Macworld

In addition to being a mythical beast, the Macalope is not an employee of Macworld. As a result, the Macalope is always free to criticize any media organization. Even ours.
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It’s good to know the nation’s paper of record is still exploring the critical issue of our time: We know Apple sucks, but why does it suck?

Matt Richtel and Brian X. Chen start out taking a look at “Tim Cook, Making Apple His Own” (tip o’ the antlers to @lvdjgarcia).

Richtel and Chen first make the startling discovery that people who are asked to make public speeches … will start to reveal things about themselves in public. It’s hard to believe, but it happens almost like clockwork to people who rise to prominent positions.

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