Prices Drop Monitor for Amazon 4.4 review: Get the best price when shopping on Amazon

Dan Moren Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan has been writing about all things Apple since 2006, when he first started contributing to the MacUser blog. Since then he's covered most of the company's major product releases and reviewed every major revision of iOS. In his "copious" free time, he's usually grinding away on a novel or two.
More by

gemfest logo 2014

Editor’s note: The following review is part of Macworld’s GemFest 2014. Every day (except weekends) from July until September, the Macworld staff will use the Mac Gems blog to briefly cover a standout free, low-cost, or great-value program. You can view a list of this year’s apps, updated daily, on our handy GemFest chart, and you can visit the Mac Gems homepage for past Mac Gems reviews.

Thanks to the Internet, comparison shopping has never been easier. And if you want to get the best deal for your dollar, the free Prices Drop Monitor (Mac App Store link) is a handy Mac utility that can help you out—assuming you do most of your shopping from Amazon.

Read more »

0

Equilibrium 1.0 review: One set of menu bar controls for iTunes and streaming music

Jonathan Seff , Macworld Follow me on Google+

Jonathan has been covering the tech industry since 1998. He loves watching TV shows on his iPhone while exercising, and has already indoctrinated his young twins in the ways of the Apple TV.
More by

gemfest logo 2014

Editor’s note: The following review is part of Macworld’s GemFest 2014. Every day (except weekends) from July until September, the Macworld staff will use the Mac Gems blog to briefly cover a standout free, low-cost, or great-value program. You can view a list of this year’s apps, updated daily, on our handy GemFest chart, and you can visit the Mac Gems homepage for past Mac Gems reviews.

Our music comes from a variety of local and streaming sources these days, and having a single, consistent interface to control them all makes listening on a Mac that much more enjoyable. Equilibrium is menu-bar item that can control iTunes, Spotify, Rdio, and Vox (as well as connect with your Last.fm account to scrobble tracks). It displays album art, artist, song title, and album name as a popover when you click on the icon. There you can control playback—including turning shuffle or repeat modes on or off—and access AirPlay options for sending the audio to other speakers in the house. Finally, when controlling iTunes, there’s an equalizer option that selects the corresponding setting within iTunes (when used with other apps the EQ button vanishes).

Read more »

1

AirBeam Pro 1.5 review: Turn your Mac and iOS devices into a home-surveillance system

Nathan Alderman , Macworld

Nathan Alderman is a writer and copy editor, and frequent Macworld contributor based in Alexandria, Virginia.
More by

gemfest logo 2014

Editor’s note: The following review is part of Macworld’s GemFest 2014. Every day (except weekends) from July until September, the Macworld staff will use the Mac Gems blog to briefly cover a standout free, low-cost, or great-value program. You can view a list of this year’s apps, updated daily, on our handy GemFest chart, and you can visit the Mac Gems homepage for past Mac Gems reviews.

Whether you want to beef up your home security, save a few bucks on a baby monitor, or just pretend you’re James Bond, Appologics UG’s AirBeam Pro (Mac App Store link) provides an inexpensive, powerful way to turn your existing Macs, iPads, and iPhones into a sophisticated home security system.

Read more »

11

InfoClick review: Find what you're looking for in Apple Mail

Dan Miller Editor, Macworld

Dan is Editor of Macworld.
More by

gemfest logo 2014

Editor’s note: The following review is part of Macworld’s GemFest 2014. Every day (except weekends) from July until September, the Macworld staff will use the Mac Gems blog to briefly cover a standout free, low-cost, or great-value program. You can view a list of this year’s apps, updated daily, on our handy GemFest chart, and you can visit the Mac Gems homepage for past Mac Gems reviews.

There are two kinds of emailers: Filers, who meticulously file away their messages into folders, and Dumpers, who just keep everything in one vast Inbox and rely on search to find messages they want. Nisus’s InfoClick has something to offer both of them, but particularly the latter.

Read more »

0

Welcome to GemFest 2014

Dan Frakes Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan writes about OS X, iOS, utilities, cool apps, and troubleshooting. He also covers hardware; mobile, audio, and AV gear; input devices; and accessories. He's been writing about tech since 1994, and he's also published software, worked in IT, and worked as a policy analyst.
More by

The Mac platform boasts an abundance of free, low-cost, and great-value software. (That’s partly because of the convenience and popularity of the Mac App Store, though the concept of excellent, inexpensive Mac apps has been around for decades.) In fact, one of the biggest challenges these days, at least when it comes to software, is that the Mac has a veritable overabundance of apps. How do you know which are the good ones—and which ones are truly great?

That’s where we come in. Here at Macworld, we call apps that give you great functionality for the price Mac Gems, and we review one or two of these products each week in our Mac Gems column. Veteran readers know that Gems reviews are special to us, because they epitomize why we do what we do: to help you make the most of your Mac without breaking the bank.

But at our usual rate of Gems reviews, we can’t keep up with everything that’s out there. So each summer, our editors, along with a number of regular Macworld contributors, collaborate on an annual Gems-review marathon, which we call GemFest (a.k.a., the Summer of Gems).

Read more »

3

Intermission 1.1 review: Pause and rewind your Mac's audio, TiVo-style

Dan Frakes Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan writes about OS X, iOS, utilities, cool apps, and troubleshooting. He also covers hardware; mobile, audio, and AV gear; input devices; and accessories. He's been writing about tech since 1994, and he's also published software, worked in IT, and worked as a policy analyst.
More by

gemfest logo 2014

Editor’s note: The following review is part of Macworld’s GemFest 2014. Every day (except weekends) from July until September, the Macworld staff will use the Mac Gems blog to briefly cover a standout free, low-cost, or great-value program. You can view a list of this year’s apps, updated daily, on our handy GemFest chart, and you can visit the Mac Gems homepage for past Mac Gems reviews.

Over the past decade or so, TiVo and similar DVRs have changed the way we watch TV—so much so that many of us take for granted that we can pause live TV, rewind to watch something again, and jump forward to skip commercials. These features have become such an ingrained part of my media-consuming experience that I often miss them when listening to music on my Mac.

Read more »

0

iReal Pro for Mac review: A harmonious practice tool for musicians

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
More by

At the risk of giving away the secrets of musicians everywhere, there are bound volumes of (sometimes legal) musical scores called “fake books.” Rather than denoting every note and rest within a composition, they instead offer a "lead sheet" made up of a single melody line and chord headings. It’s then the musician’s job to devise an arrangement (read: fake their way through) based on this bare outline. The most well known of these fake books is the Real Book, which is full of jazz standards.

I mention all this to give you some idea where iReal Pro (Mac App Store link) gets its name. (iReal Pro is available in versions for iOS, Android, and the Mac; I discuss the Mac version, which costs $20, here.)

iReal Pro is more than a collection of musical scores (known as “charts” to us hep-cats). It’s additionally an auto-accompaniment application rudimentarily similar to PG Music’s $129 Band-in-a-Box. The idea is that you select a chart and press Play, and iReal Pro plays a three-instrument backing track—drums, bass, and piano (or guitar), for example. Your job is to play or sing along with this virtual band.

Read more »

0