FilePane review: Expand the power of drag-and-drop on your Mac

Andrew Hayward Contributor, Macworld

Andrew Hayward is a Chicago-based games, apps, and gadgets writer whose work has been featured in more than 50 publications. He's also a work-at-home dad to a wild toddler.
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For creative professionals—especially those with work that involves a social media or online content component—FilePane (Mac App Store link) can be a true timesaver thanks to its quick access to various helpful actions via a handy and inventive drag-and-drop approach. It’s an app that works not only with files on your desktop or within Finder windows, but also images and text on websites and in documents.

FilePane

FilePane

Clicking and dragging any file on your Mac, along with any image or text, prompts a Drop Here button to appear nearby on the screen. Dropping the selected file or item atop that image pulls up a tiny command box with a handful of icons that correspond with actions. You’ll be able to quickly resize an image (and maintain proportions), print a file, create an archive or PDF file, send a file via email or AirDrop, or even post something to Twitter or Facebook—and there are a few other small tasks available from that box.

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Periscope Pro review: Keep an eye on your domicile with this Mac surveillance app

Dan Moren Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan has been writing about all things Apple since 2006, when he first started contributing to the MacUser blog. Since then he's covered most of the company's major product releases and reviewed every major revision of iOS. In his "copious" free time, he's usually grinding away on a novel or two.
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Maybe you’re going out of town for a while; maybe you live in a rough neighborhood; maybe you just wonder what your pets are up to all day. No matter the reason, the $50 Periscope Pro (Mac App Store link) from ZipZapMac can help you keep an eye on your domicile.

Periscope Pro’s a surveillance app that regularly takes video from your Mac’s camera, a connected webcam, or a third party IP-enabled camera—which doesn’t even have to be within your home. What triggers the recording is up to you: Periscope Pro can record continuously, or only when motion, sound, or some combination of both is detected. The video, in a frame rate and resolution of your choice, is stored on your computer’s drive, and it’s watchable either via the app itself, or simply by opening up the folder you choose.

Periscope Pro

Periscope Pro

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ColorSnapper review: Get color values from any pixel on your screen

Marco Tabini , Macworld

Marco Tabini is based in Toronto, Canada, where he focuses on software development for mobile devices and for the Web.
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If you’re a longtime user of OS X, you’re probably familiar with Apple’s Digital Color Meter (found in Applications > Utilities), a simple utility that magnifies the contents of the screen under the mouse pointer and lets you copy the RGB color components of the resulting pixel.

ColorSnapper

ColorSnapper

ColorSnapper (Mac App Store link) takes the concept a little further, providing a convenient way to instantly capture a specific color from your screen in a variety of formats. Once installed, the app becomes available in your menu bar, from where it can be invoked either via a mouse click or by using a global shortcut (the app defaults to Command-Control-C, which may interfere with the functionality provided by other apps, but you can change the shortcut).

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Fonts review: Preview your Mac's fonts with this app's attractive interface

Michael Simon Contributor, Macworld

Michael Simon has been obsessed with Apple since before there was an "I" in fanboy.
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There’s nothing sexy about font management. Designers often have hundreds of typesets to sort through, and keeping track of them all can be a big pain, especially when a deadline is looming. With an elegant WYSIWYG interface that focuses on organization rather than activation, Fonts opens up your suitcase wide enough to show you everything inside, and just might eliminate the pesky trial-and-error method.

Bohemian Coding Fonts

Bohemian Coding Fonts

If you’re looking for a replacement for Apple’s Font Book, however, you’re bound to be disappointed; in actuality, Fonts is more of a browser than a manager, but what it lacks in professional features it makes up for in usefulness. Each time it’s launched, the app quickly scans your designated folders for any new fonts, filling up its iOS-styled window with an alphabetical list of every typeface it finds.

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iBetterCharge review: Track your iOS device's battery life while using your Mac

Jeffery Battersby , Macworld

Jeffery Battersby is an Apple Certified Trainer, (very) smalltime actor, and regular contributor to Macworld. He writes about Macs and more at his blog, jeffbattersby.com.
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iBetterCharge

iBetterCharge menu bar access

I’ve done it, you know you’ve done it and that’s because it’s such an easy thing to do, but iBetterCharge has got your back. Your iPhone or iPad sits in your bag or on your desk, unplugged and not charging. Not a big deal, until you realize late in the day and right before you head out for the night, that you’ve got less that 20 percent of battery life left and and several hours ahead before you can charge your phone.

iBetterCharge uses iTunes Wi-Fi syncing to keep its finger on the pulse of your iOS device’s battery. You have four options for setting notification thresholds for the app. When your battery reaches 50, 20, 10, or 5 percent of its capacity you’ll receive a notification reminding you to plug your device in for a charge.

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Day One review: A Mac app that's so nice, you'll actually maintain your journal

Nathan Alderman , Macworld

Nathan Alderman is a writer and copy editor, and frequent Macworld contributor based in Alexandria, Virginia.
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I’ve kept paper journals in the past, but never stuck with them. Filling those blank pages felt too much like a chore. Bloom Built’s superb Day One (Mac App Store link) makes keeping a journal easier than ever, thanks to smart features and a beautiful, welcoming interface.

Day One

Day One

At every turn, Day One does its best to get out of your way and let you write. The app offers helpful (if generic) prompts like “Do you have any favorite pets?” above each new entry window to get you going. These little nudges take away some of the pressure of the empty space below them. You can also fire off quick entries straight from an icon on your menubar, if opening the app itself is too much of a hassle. Day One can even gently remind you to write something; just tell it what time of day, and how often you wish it to prod you.

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Memory Diag review: Keep an eye on your Mac's RAM

Michael Simon Contributor, Macworld

Michael Simon has been obsessed with Apple since before there was an "I" in fanboy.
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Memory Diag

Memory Diag

Unless you’ve spent a bundle to max out your Mac Pro with a couple pairs of 16GB RAM sticks, there’s a good chance you’ve experienced the occasional OS X slowdown. Even with Mavericks’ smart memory management, apps can still leak precious resources, causing all but the newest Macs to feel downright sluggish at times. Memory Diag won’t necessarily take away these issues, but it’ll help you pinpoint your trouble, contain the problem and get back to work.

Apple has always offered a way to track memory usage in Activity Monitor, but Memory Diag takes that data out of the app and puts it into the menu bar. A tiny thermometer icon gives you an approximation of how much RAM is being used by your system, and you’ll find a wealth of information after clicking on it, most notably a color-coded pie chart that breaks down your memory allotment and tells you which apps are doing the most damage. A second screen shows a summary of the available memory and the amount of RAM installed in each slot, though it would be more useful if it listed the type, too.

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