Draft Control review: Keep track of the changes made in text documents

Dan Miller Editor, Macworld

Dan is Editor of Macworld.
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There are plenty of ways to keep track of changes made to a text document. You can use the track-changes tools built into your word processor (assuming it has them). If your needs are more sophisticated, particularly if you’re collaborating with others, you can use a sophisticated version-control system such as Github, Subversion, CVS. Or you can use a dedicated utility such as Kaleidoscope (which can compare documents, images, and even folders).

But if all you really want to track are changes to plain-text or word-processing documents, you have another simpler alternative: Draft Control (Mac App Store link). It’s dead-simple to use: You add the document you want to track to Draft Control’s My Documents list (either by clicking on the + Document button or dragging it into the Draft Control window from the Finder). Thereafter, any time you save the document, Draft Control will take a snapshot of that version; in its preview window, it color-codes all additions to and deletions from the previous version. If you want, you can give those versions descriptive labels (instead of the app’s default time-stamps). You can also organize them into folders within the Draft Control interface. (Those organizational changes don’t roll over to the OS X file-system.)

Draft Control

Draft Control

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Folderol review: Add color to your OS X Finder folders

Dan Frakes Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan writes about OS X, iOS, utilities, cool apps, and troubleshooting. He also covers hardware; mobile, audio, and AV gear; input devices; and accessories. He's been writing about tech since 1994, and he's also published software, worked in IT, and worked as a policy analyst. You can find him on the web at danfrakes.com.
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Mavericks’s Finder tags feature offers a number of benefits over the older file and folder labels, but one of the drawbacks of tags is that items are no longer colored with your preferred tag (nee label) color—you see just a tiny, colored dot next to the file name. The reason for this is clear: While you could apply only a single label to a file or folder in OS X 10.8 and earlier, you can apply multiple tags to files, so OS X wouldn’t know which of those tags to use for the item color.

Still, I really miss the colored folders of old, as I used those colors as quick-glance “Hey, this is [important/finished/etc.]” indicators. I’ve been able to restore an approximation of this feature using Erica Sadun’s $3 Folderol, which makes it quick and easy to colorize the icon of any folder.

Launch Folderol, and its window offers a row of default folder colors; click one to chose that color, or click the swatch to the right to choose any custom color using the OS X color picker. Whichever you do, your chosen color appears in the large drag-and-drop area above. Drag one or more folders into that area, and Folderol instantly gives each folder the appropriate colored-folder icon.

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Flexiglass review: Control OS X windows with your keyboard and multitouch gestures

Serenity Caldwell Associate Editor, Macworld

Serenity has been writing and talking and tinkering with Apple products since she was old enough to double-click. In her spare time, she sketches, writes, acts, sings, and wears an assortment of hats.
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Flexiglass (Mac App Store link) is a neat idea for window resizing from Mac development company Nulana: it uses keyboard shortcuts and multitouch gestures to help you quickly move your windows from place to place without dragging and dropping.

Flexiglass

In addition, you can use several keyboard shortcuts to automatically resize windows to a certain portion of the screen—for instance, centering a window, or making it expand to fill the top half of the screen only.

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Head for Facebook review: Direct access to Facebook on your Mac desktop

Serenity Caldwell Associate Editor, Macworld

Serenity has been writing and talking and tinkering with Apple products since she was old enough to double-click. In her spare time, she sketches, writes, acts, sings, and wears an assortment of hats.
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Head for Facebook

Head for Facebook

Sometimes, the best utilities aren’t something you necessarily can’t live without, but a little tool that makes your overall computing experience better. Head for Facebook is a tiny little circle that lives on a corner of your screen and, when clicked, reveals the Facebook.com website in a Web view (mobile or desktop), blurring out the rest of your desktop. Another click, and the website disappears.

Given that Facebook has no desktop client, Head is a nice way to separate your social media interactions from your day-to-day Safari or Chrome use. I like it because, like my Twitter client, it’s an app I can check on regularly scheduled breaks, rather than having a tab on your browser distracting you from otherwise productive tasks. (And I don’t even use Facebook all that often—imagine how useful it could be if that’s your primary social networking service!)

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Powershot 1.5 review: Annotate your screenshots as you shoot them

Chris Barylick , Macworld

Chris Barylick is an Apple-Certified Macintosh Technician living in the San Francisco Bay Area. In his 25 years of tinkering with Macs, he has accidentally lit two (and counting) hard drives on fire. He also wouldn't mind being Gonzo the Muppet when he finally grows up.
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Team Apollo Powershot

Team Apollo Powershot

As robust as the screen capture features in OS X are, there’s always room for improvement. Team Apollo’s Powershot 1.5 fills this role nicely, offering a lightweight, efficient utility that allows you to configure keystrokes for taking screenshots, target the areas of the screen that will be used in the screenshot, lets you specify what will be done with the image file, and allows quick line drawings, shapes and annotations to be added to the finished product.

Team Apollo Powershot
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EtreCheck review: Get a full status report on your troubled Mac

Marco Tabini , Macworld

Marco Tabini is based in Toronto, Canada, where he focuses on software development for mobile devices and for the Web.
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Diagnosing a computer problem can be a daunting task even when you’re standing right in front of a Mac. When you’re doing it remotely—perhaps to help someone of less-than-stellar technical skill—gathering all the information required to figure out what’s not working can be a downright miserable experience for everyone involved.

EtreCheck attempts to alleviate this problem by automatically collecting a full set of statistics about the Mac on which it runs, from its hardware components, to installed apps and kernel extensions—going as far as quickly sampling your system to determine which programs are taking up the most RAM and CPU time.

EtreCheck

EtreCheck

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Network Radar review: Mac app checks your network health

Dan Moren Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan has been writing about all things Apple since 2006, when he first started contributing to the MacUser blog. Since then he's covered most of the company's major product releases and reviewed every major revision of iOS. In his "copious" free time, he's usually grinding away on a novel or two.
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Apple’s own Network Utility is pretty handy for basic network troubleshooting, but if you need to go above and beyond what it offers, Daniel Diener’s $20 Network Radar (Mac App Store link) is a powerful step up.

Network Radar

Network Radar

Like Apple’s own app, Network Radar offers many common network tools, including ping, port scan, and whois. But it doesn’t stop there: The app can quickly scan your entire network and display a list of devices on it, along with their IP addresses, what services they offer, and more. If you need quick access via services like Telnet, SSH, or HTTP, you can access those for any device by right-clicking on its entry.

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