News Notifications review: Add RSS feeds to OS X's Notification Center

Andrew Hayward Contributor, Macworld

Andrew Hayward is a Chicago-based games, apps, and gadgets writer whose work has been featured in more than 50 publications. He's also a work-at-home dad to a wild toddler.
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Compared to the best-known RSS feed readers on the market today, News Notifications (Mac App Store link) is as straightforward and uncomplicated as its drab title implies. You won't find cloud sync to an iOS app, community-driven article recommendations, or a directory of top sites to add. It's simply a Mac app that lets you add feeds from your favorite Web sources and have them appear in your Notification Center—that's really about it. For the Mac user who has no need for social sharing features or the ability to carry his/her reading history over to other computers or an iPhone or iPad, this single-minded reader should do the trick.

News Notifications

News Notifications

Simply input the URL of a favorite site and News Notifications will seek out the correct feed link, although you can manually point it towards a specific RSS feed for sites with specialized categories or sections. From there, you can choose how many stories you'd like to see from the site at once and how often you want the app to check for updates, and then stories will pop up throughout the day via notifications with the title and posting time listed.

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Document Writer review: A cheap alternative to Microsoft Word

Chris Holt , Macworld

Chris is a former Macworld editor who has turned to a life of crime.
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Good, affordable, lightweight word processors are rare finds on the App Store, and that’s what makes Document Writer 1.2 (Mac App Store link) such a compelling product. It’s not going to rival the full product of Microsoft Word, but it’s certainly a step up from Open Office and even may get some defectors from Google Docs.

Document Writer has a fairly intuitive interface, with tools that you’ve come to expect: paste, cut, undo, redo, print, save, text size, color, insert image, insert boxes, find, URL creation, and numerous formatting buttons. Changing from normal spacing to double is a breeze, and creating numbered lists, columns, and other more particular formatting demands are equally easy. Again, it’s not as expansive as Microsoft Word, but understanding the numerous unmarked buttons takes only a few seconds.

Document Writer

Document Writer

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PlainTextMenu review: Takes the fuss and muss out of cut-and-paste

Serenity Caldwell Associate Editor, Macworld

Serenity has been writing and talking and tinkering with Apple products since she was old enough to double-click. In her spare time, she sketches, writes, acts, sings, and wears an assortment of hats.
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If you spend a lot of time copying and pasting formatted text from the Internet or Microsoft Word, you might just adore PlainTextMenu: It strips out colors, formatting, bold text, and all the pesky things that make sharing or pasting text a pain between programs.

PlainTextMenu

PlainTextMenu

Sometimes, of course, it’s the rich text you want; the app offers a trigger so that you can have all text automatically converted or choose when to manually de-decorate your copied text. There are also options to auto-convert to all uppercase letters (if you’re feeling a HULK RAGE coming on), all lowercase (dabble in the poetry of e.e. cummings), or sentence capitalization.

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StorageStatus review: Be a little smarter about how you use your storage

Michael Simon Contributor, Macworld

Michael Simon has been obsessed with Apple since before there was an "I" in fanboy.
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StorageStatus

StorageStatus

Connected drives are the lifeblood of my workflow. No matter how much internal storage I have in my machine, I still keep an arsenal of external drives around for backups, music, videos, and anything else I don’t want bogging down my day-to-day.

Once they’re plugged in, though, I tend to forget about them, to the point where I often pull them out without properly ejecting. StorageStatus (Mac App Store link) active menu bar icon didn’t just alleviate my absent-mindedness, it taught me to identify each drive’s cycles so to better maximize efficiency.

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FruitJuice review: Practice good battery health with your MacBook

Nathan Alderman , Macworld

Nathan Alderman is a writer and copy editor, and frequent Macworld contributor based in Alexandria, Virginia.
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Leaving your MacBook plugged in all the time—for example, in order to use it with an external monitor while its lid’s shut—can be bad for the battery’s longevity. The Battery Project’s FruitJuice (Mac App Store link) aims to help you keep your battery healthy by telling you when and for how long you’ll need to unplug each day.

FruitJuice

FruitJuice

There’s no sophisticated voodoo behind this process. FruitJuice is simply tracking your previous week’s battery behavior, then recommending you stay unplugged for 20 percent of the time you typically use your laptop. You can configure a small but legible menubar icon to show you how many minutes of unplugged time remain. You can remain unplugged as long as you like, but FruitJuice will send you reasonably unobtrusive notifications when you’re free to plug in again.

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Leafnote review: Focus on writing, not on how to use the app

Michael Simon Contributor, Macworld

Michael Simon has been obsessed with Apple since before there was an "I" in fanboy.
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iOS has changed the way we write. The ultra-minimal, file-free workspaces we use on our iPhones and iPads have gradually made their way to our Macs, making formatting toolbars and nested folders all but obsolete. Leafnote (Mac App Store link) isn’t quite as stark as other text editors, but it takes plenty of cues from iOS, resulting in a simple, speedy, and organized writing experience.

Leafnote

Leafnote

The writing area itself is as plain as you’d expect from a modern word processor, with a clean, white canvas. As is the norm with minimal text editors, there’s a distinct lack of options—aside from some rudimentary formatting (bold, italics, and underline), you won’t be able to do much of anything to your text. Even the default font and size are fixed, but the inclusion of an emoji menu is a nice touch.

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Disk Diag review: Get rid of unnecessary space-hogging files on your hard drive

Nathan Alderman , Macworld

Nathan Alderman is a writer and copy editor, and frequent Macworld contributor based in Alexandria, Virginia.
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Disk Diag

Disk Diag

The bigger hard drives get, the more room they provide for unwanted files to clutter up your disk and steal space you could otherwise put to better use. Rocky Sand Studio’s Disk Diag (Mac App Store link) hunts down and eliminates these megabyte-hogging miscreants, while keeping you fully informed and in control of the process.

On startup, a simple but beautifully-animated speedometer-style dial snappily shows you the ratio of empty to occupied space on your drive. Click the Start button, and in a few more seconds you’ll see how much space Disk Diag thinks it can free up for you. The program breaks this chunk of disk space into multiple categories, including your caches, your log files, and your Downloads folder. You can turn each on or off individually, and by clicking icons that appear when you mouse over each category, you can open a Finder window with the files in question, or get a plain-English explanation of what the files do and why you might want to delete them.

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