Safari Keyword Search review: Searching made simple and speedy

Dan Moren Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan has been writing about all things Apple since 2006, when he first started contributing to the MacUser blog. Since then he's covered most of the company's major product releases and reviewed every major revision of iOS. In his "copious" free time, he's usually grinding away on a novel or two.
More by

About 90 percent of the time that I’m on the Web (to use a number I picked out of thin air), I’m searching for something. But while I usually turn to Google, my search engine of choice, there are times that I want to search a specific site—say, IMDB or Wikipedia. It seems like a waste time to have to go to the desired site, find its search box, and type my search query. Luckily, I can do all that right off the bat with the help of third-party software.

Safari Keyword Search is an extension for Safari 5.1 or later that mimics a feature found in Chrome and Firefox: You can define keywords that allow you to search particular sites right from Safari’s unified URL/search field. The extension is free, though the developer requests a donation if you find it useful.

For example, say I want to look up some information about the actor Sean Connery. I could type his name into Safari’s search bar, wait for Google to load the results, and then click on the Wikipedia page for Sean Connery (which would presumably show up near the top of the hits). Or I could simply type “w Sean Connery” into the URL field, and be taken right to his Wikipedia page. (W is Safari Keyword Search’s abbreviation for a Wikipedia search.) It’s speedy, unobtrusive, and efficient.

Read more »

5

HandBrakeBatch review: Easy-does-it batch video conversion

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
More by

When you mention HandBrake around media-savvy Mac users, DVD ripping is the first thing that comes to mind. And while HandBrake is indeed a great tool for ripping the DVDs you own, it’s also quite a good (and free) video-conversion tool, letting you take video that doesn’t play on a particular device (like, say, an iPhone or an Apple TV) and converting it to a format that does. One thing that HandBrake doesn’t handle very elegantly, however, is batch processing—converting a bunch of video files in one shot.

In fact, for a long time, HandBrake didn’t support batch processing at all. It’s recently gained this feature, but it’s still not as easy as it could be: To batch process a group of videos, you must click HandBrake’s Source button, navigate to a folder full of videos that you wish to convert, choose File > Add All Titles To Queue, select the conversion preset you want to use, and then click Start. If the desired videos happen to be spread across several folders or volumes, you must repeat this process for each folder or volume. While the procedure is hardly painful, it’s not as easy as simply dragging movies into a single window, choosing a preset, and then starting the conversion.

Fortunately, there’s a utility that does exactly that: Cesare Tagliaferri’s HandBrakeBatch, and it doesn’t even require that you install HandBrake—HandBrakeBatch includes the open-source components of HandBrake necessary to perform conversions. (Though if HandBrake is installed on your Mac, and you’ve added any custom conversion presets, HandBrakeBatch will be able to use those presets.) HandBrakeBatch is free to download, but the developer asks that if you find it useful, you donate to a charity.

Read more »

5

Mac Gems: Wrapping up GemFest 2013

Dan Frakes Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan writes about OS X, iOS, utilities, cool apps, and troubleshooting. He also covers hardware; mobile, audio, and AV gear; input devices; and accessories. He's been writing about tech since 1994, and he's also published software, worked in IT, and worked as a policy analyst.
More by

The end of summer means cooler weather, more-colorful trees, and new Apple products. But here at Mac Gems HQ, it also means the end of GemFest (a.k.a., the Summer of Gems). We started the 2013 edition way back on July 22 and continued through September 28, publishing a review of a Mac Gem—a great, inexpensive Mac app—Every day except Sunday.

That means that over the course of summer 2013, we published roughly 60 Mac Gems reviews. As I wrote at the time:

As with the software we normally cover in Mac Gems, some of the apps will be delightfully simple, while others will be more complex. Some will be specialized and have narrow appeal, while others should be useful to nearly everyone. Each and every one will earn the Mac Gems label.

Read more »

0

Transmit 4 review: One of the best FTP clients for the Mac

David Chartier Contributor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

David has been covering Apple and how to get the most out of its products since 2005. Now a freelance tech writer, he runs Finer Things in Tech, jots down thoughts at DavidChartier.com, occasionally starts outlining the great American tech novel, and might still get to snowboard Breckenridge one more time.
More by

Editor’s note: The following review is part of Macworld’s GemFest 2013. Every day (except Sunday) from mid-July until late September, the Macworld staff will use the Mac Gems blog to briefly cover a standout free or low-cost program. Learn more about GemFest in this Macworld podcast. You can view a list of this year’s apps, updated daily, on our handy GemFest page, and you can visit the Mac Gems homepage for past Mac Gems reviews.

You run a website, or maybe you just have files on your computer and you need to get them up to your webserver that’s somewhere in the cloud. Transmit 4 (Mac App Store link), an FTP client from Panic, is one of your best options for making that journey there and back again.

Read more »

24

Quicksand review: Keep copies of your most recent files anywhere you want

Albert Filice Editorial Assistant, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Albert is a former PCWorld and Macworld intern and GeekTech writer, who now works as an Editorial Assistant in the PCWorld Lab. Albert likes to dabble in Web development in his free time. Check him out on Dribbble, or see some of his work on CodePen.
More by

Editor’s note: The following review is part of Macworld’s GemFest 2013. Every day (except Sunday) from mid-July until late September, the Macworld staff will use the Mac Gems blog to briefly cover a standout free or low-cost program. Learn more about GemFest in this Macworld podcast. You can view a list of this year’s apps, updated daily, on our handy GemFest page, and you can visit the Mac Gems homepage for past Mac Gems reviews.

When it comes to syncing files and folders across devices, Dropbox inevitably comes up. However, Dropbox does take some amount of curating, and occasionally you can forget to put that new file you just made into Dropbox. The aim of Quicksand 1.02 is to keep a copy recently-opened files in a single convenient location so you can access the files from any computer.

Read more »

0

ResolutionTab review: Resolve your resolution-switching problems

Roman Loyola Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Roman has covered technology since the early 1990s. His career started at MacUser, and he's worked for MacAddict, Mac|Life, TechTV, PC/Computing, and Windows NT Systems.
More by

Editor’s note: The following review is part of Macworld’s GemFest 2013. Every day (except Sunday) from mid-July until late September, the Macworld staff will use the Mac Gems blog to briefly cover a standout free or low-cost program. Learn more about GemFest in this Macworld podcast. You can view a list of this year’s apps, updated daily, on our handy GemFest page, and you can visit the Mac Gems homepage for past Mac Gems reviews.

OS X doesn’t provide menu-bar access to screen resolutions, but there are plenty of third-party apps that can do the trick, including Eye-Friendly, Pupil, and QuickRes. ResolutionTab 1.1 (Mac App Store link) joins the fray and the $2 app is a viable option.

Read more »

3

Erato review: See Markdown previews in real time

Marco Tabini , Macworld

Marco Tabini is based in Toronto, Canada, where he focuses on software development for mobile devices and for the Web.
More by

Editor’s note: The following review is part of Macworld’s GemFest 2013. Every day (except Sunday) from mid-July until late September, the Macworld staff will use the Mac Gems blog to briefly cover a standout free or low-cost program. Learn more about GemFest in this Macworld podcast. You can view a list of this year’s apps, updated daily, on our handy GemFest page, and you can visit the Mac Gems homepage for past Mac Gems reviews.

Many authors like use the Markdown format for writing because of its simplicity, portability, and ease of use. Lovers of the format will find themselves right at home with Erato 1.1.1 (Mac App Store link), which allows you to edit a Markdown file side-by-side with a live preview version of its compiled output.

Read more »

5