Use Printopia to send docs and photos to your Mac

Dan Frakes Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan writes about OS X, iOS, utilities, cool apps, and troubleshooting. He also covers hardware; mobile, audio, and AV gear; input devices; and accessories. He's been writing about tech since 1994, and he's also published software, worked in IT, and worked as a policy analyst. You can find him on the web at danfrakes.com.
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Ecamm’s Printopia lets you print from your iOS devices to any printer connected to your Mac. But in this video, I show you how to configure virtual printers for saving documents and images from your iOS devices—or even from other Macs—to your Mac.

Transcript

Way back in iOS 4.2, AirPrint promised to let you print, wirelessly, from your iOS device to any printer shared by your Mac. But AirPrint ended up working with only a few specific, AirPrint-enabled printers.

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How to rip a Blu-ray disc

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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[Editor’s note: The MPAA and most media companies argue that you can’t legally copy or convert commercial DVDs or Blu-ray discs for any reason. We (and others) think that, if you own one of these discs, you should be able to override its copy protection to make a backup copy or to convert its content for viewing on other devices. Currently, the law isn’t entirely clear one way or the other. So our advice is: If you don’t own it, don’t do it. If you do own it, think before you rip.]

Over the years we’ve talked about creating backups and portable copies of the DVD media you own. But the world of disc-based media has shifted largely to Blu-ray. Once upon a time ripping Blu-ray discs wasn’t all that necessary because these discs came with digital copies available from the iTunes Store. Regrettably, the movie industry has moved to the Ultraviolet digital copy scheme which is neither convenient nor reliable, so it’s back to ripping we go.

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Use the Finder's tags feature from the keyboard

Dan Frakes Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan writes about OS X, iOS, utilities, cool apps, and troubleshooting. He also covers hardware; mobile, audio, and AV gear; input devices; and accessories. He's been writing about tech since 1994, and he's also published software, worked in IT, and worked as a policy analyst. You can find him on the web at danfrakes.com.
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The Finder’s tags feature, which debuted in Mavericks (OS X 10.9), can be quite useful. But if you prefer to use the keyboard instead of a mouse or trackpad, you may find it limiting. This video shows you how to take full advantage of tags without lifting your fingers from the keyboard.

Transcript

One of the big new features in the Finder in Mavericks is tags. Much like labels in older versions of OS X, tags let you assign categories to files and folders, though in Mavericks, you can assign multiple tags to the same item. Once you tag items, you can sort files by tag, or even use tags as criteria for smart folders. For example, I’ve got a smart folder that displays all items in my Work directory with an orange or red tag – I call it my High Priority folder.

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Troubleshoot Mac network issues with Network Utility

Dan Moren Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan has been writing about all things Apple since 2006, when he first started contributing to the MacUser blog. Since then he's covered most of the company's major product releases and reviewed every major revision of iOS. In his "copious" free time, he's usually grinding away on a novel or two.
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This is senior editor Dan Moren. We take networking for granted these days, but it’s still a complicated beast. If you want to go under the hood, Apple includes a suite of tools on your Mac to help you troubleshoot networking issues; they’re all included in the Network Utility app, which you can find in System/Library/CoreServices/Applications—though it’s probably easier to simply type “Network Utility” into Spotlight.

When you first launch Network Utility, you’ll see a single window with a variety of tabs, each of which offers different information. The first tab, Info, provides information about your own computer, offering a drop-down menu of all your network interfaces—for example, if you have both wired ethernet and Wi-Fi connections. When you select one, you’ll see the Hardware Address, associated IP, speed, and information about how much data is going in and out of that particular connection. Most often you’ll refer to the info here when troubleshooting issues.

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5 tips for avoiding Internet dopiness

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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I don’t know a single person incapable of making mistakes. We are, after all, human. However, I know just as few people who like to broadcast those mistakes to the rest of the world. Here are five mistakes that are easy to make and, hopefully, just as easy to avoid.

Avoid Reply All like the plague. Unless you’re absolutely sure everyone receiving your reply cares, leave this option alone. Far too often someone enters or exits a company and Welcome or Bon Voyage messages are reacted to with “Welcome Aboard” or “Good luck!” replies sent to a lot of people who just don’t care.

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Add time and location-based notifications to reminders

Serenity Caldwell Associate Editor, Macworld

Serenity has been writing and talking and tinkering with Apple products since she was old enough to double-click. In her spare time, she sketches, writes, acts, sings, and wears an assortment of hats.
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The Reminders app makes it simple to keep track of tasks, grocery lists, and even daily exercises with multilayered lists and checkboxes. You can make these lists even more powerful, however, thanks to time and location-based reminders.

For example, I have a “Places to Eat” reminders list, to keep track of interesting new restaurants I want to try. But when you’re craving food on a Friday night, it’s difficult to remember to look at the list.

That’s where time-based reminders come in: I can simply set up an alert on a restaurant I’m interested in visiting by tapping the entry, then tapping the info button to the right. Flip the “Remind me on a day” toggle, and you’ll be able to pick when the app should alert you. You can even make the reminder repeat, in case it’s 6PM and you’ve already ordered takeout.

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iOS

16 things you should know how to do with Siri

Dan Miller Editor, Macworld

Dan is Editor of Macworld.
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Siri is, of course, a marvel of modern technology. But it’s also one of those things that a lot of us don’t use as much as we could or should. So a couple of Macworld editors, particularly Senior Editor Dan Frakes, put together the following list of 16 things we think everybody should know how to do using Siri.

1. Search for stuff on the Web Siri can perform Web searches (using Google, Bing, or Yahoo), get answers to more specialized questions using Wolfram Alpha (“What’s the square root of pi?”), find reviews of businesses (using Yelp), search Wikipedia, and so on. Just phrase your question in natural language, and then tap a search result to go to the source site (or app) for more information.

2. Control system settings: Siri’s become a bit smarter across the board in iOS 7. One of its major improvements is in its ability to control your device's settings. You can ask Siri to turn Bluetooth on or off, open a specific Settings pane, and even turn on Airplane Mode (though Apple’s voice assistant gets a little snarky if you ask for that last one). If you need to change a setting Siri doesn’t directly support, and you can’t quite remember how to get to that settings screen, you can also open many top-level settings groups, and some second-level screens, in the Settings app—for example, “Open Notification Center settings.” This feature doesn’t work for every section of the Settings app—especially those related to security—but it’s worth trying when you need to quickly tweak the way your device works.

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