5 tips for avoiding Internet dopiness

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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Transcript

I don’t know a single person incapable of making mistakes. We are, after all, human. However, I know just as few people who like to broadcast those mistakes to the rest of the world. Here are five mistakes that are easy to make and, hopefully, just as easy to avoid.

Avoid Reply All like the plague. Unless you’re absolutely sure everyone receiving your reply cares, leave this option alone. Far too often someone enters or exits a company and Welcome or Bon Voyage messages are reacted to with “Welcome Aboard” or “Good luck!” replies sent to a lot of people who just don’t care.

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Add time and location-based notifications to reminders

Serenity Caldwell Associate Editor, Macworld

Serenity has been writing and talking and tinkering with Apple products since she was old enough to double-click. In her spare time, she sketches, writes, acts, sings, and wears an assortment of hats.
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The Reminders app makes it simple to keep track of tasks, grocery lists, and even daily exercises with multilayered lists and checkboxes. You can make these lists even more powerful, however, thanks to time and location-based reminders.

For example, I have a “Places to Eat” reminders list, to keep track of interesting new restaurants I want to try. But when you’re craving food on a Friday night, it’s difficult to remember to look at the list.

That’s where time-based reminders come in: I can simply set up an alert on a restaurant I’m interested in visiting by tapping the entry, then tapping the info button to the right. Flip the “Remind me on a day” toggle, and you’ll be able to pick when the app should alert you. You can even make the reminder repeat, in case it’s 6PM and you’ve already ordered takeout.

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iOS

16 things you should know how to do with Siri

Dan Miller Editor, Macworld

Dan is Editor of Macworld.
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Siri is, of course, a marvel of modern technology. But it’s also one of those things that a lot of us don’t use as much as we could or should. So a couple of Macworld editors, particularly Senior Editor Dan Frakes, put together the following list of 16 things we think everybody should know how to do using Siri.

1. Search for stuff on the Web Siri can perform Web searches (using Google, Bing, or Yahoo), get answers to more specialized questions using Wolfram Alpha (“What’s the square root of pi?”), find reviews of businesses (using Yelp), search Wikipedia, and so on. Just phrase your question in natural language, and then tap a search result to go to the source site (or app) for more information.

2. Control system settings: Siri’s become a bit smarter across the board in iOS 7. One of its major improvements is in its ability to control your device's settings. You can ask Siri to turn Bluetooth on or off, open a specific Settings pane, and even turn on Airplane Mode (though Apple’s voice assistant gets a little snarky if you ask for that last one). If you need to change a setting Siri doesn’t directly support, and you can’t quite remember how to get to that settings screen, you can also open many top-level settings groups, and some second-level screens, in the Settings app—for example, “Open Notification Center settings.” This feature doesn’t work for every section of the Settings app—especially those related to security—but it’s worth trying when you need to quickly tweak the way your device works.

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iOS

Build a custom lock screen to save your iPhone, your iPad, or even your life

Dan Frakes Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan writes about OS X, iOS, utilities, cool apps, and troubleshooting. He also covers hardware; mobile, audio, and AV gear; input devices; and accessories. He's been writing about tech since 1994, and he's also published software, worked in IT, and worked as a policy analyst. You can find him on the web at danfrakes.com.
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If someone finds your lost iPhone or iPad, the first thing they’ll do is turn it on. If you’re in an accident, or you have a medical emergency, first responders often look for your phone or tablet to identify you and learn important information such as allergies and blood type. In this video tip, we show you how to easily create a custom lock-screen image that can save your device—or you.

Transcript

I’m Macworld senior editor Dan Frakes.

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Bring a smile to your Macs and iOS devices by enabling emoji

Dan Moren Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan has been writing about all things Apple since 2006, when he first started contributing to the MacUser blog. Since then he's covered most of the company's major product releases and reviewed every major revision of iOS. In his "copious" free time, he's usually grinding away on a novel or two.
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You could just write all your emails, Twitter posts, and Facebook missives in plain old text, but where's the fun in that? Monkeys, planes, and cups of coffee are where it's at these days, and they’re all just a click away, thanks to emoji. If you’re a Mac or iOS user, setting up these icons (which originally hail from Japan) is dead simple.

Transcript

Hi, this is senior editor Dan Moren. While the old colon-dash-close-parentheses smiley face may be universal, emoticons are so 20th century. You’ve probably run across emoji, the small icons that now pop up on the Web, in emails, and of course, on Twitter. Maybe you’ve even wondered how you can populate your own social networking posts with an adorable Home Alone kitten face.

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How to create networked backups with OS X Server

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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In this short video I show you how to create a backup server capable of handling all the Macs on your local network. Cost? Just 20 bucks.

Transcript

We’ve pretty well established that everyone should back up their data, right? Good. Now let’s talk about easily backing up the data not only on your main computer, but those computers connected to your local network. There are a variety of remedies for doing this, but I want to show you one that uses Apple’s Time Machine technology and costs just $20.

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How to set up keyboard shortcuts in OS X

Dan Miller Editor, Macworld

Dan is Editor of Macworld.
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Today I wanted to show you how to create keyboard shortcuts in OS X.

First, the why: Why would you want to create keyboard shortcuts? The first and most obvious reason is that you simply want to be able to invoke a command quickly and easily without mousing through a bunch of menus. One other reason: Poorly designed apps might use one of OS X’s global shortcuts for their own purposes, and you need to resolve such conflicts. Whatever the reason, creating your own keyboard shortcuts for a given app is really simple.

The first step is note the exact spelling and phrasing of the command you want to create a shortcut for. To do so, just open the app, find the menu command, and note the phrasing and spelling. That includes any ellipses (those three little “periods” at the end of the command).

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