iOS

Enable parental restrictions on your iOS device

Dan Moren Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan has been writing about all things Apple since 2006, when he first started contributing to the MacUser blog. Since then he's covered most of the company's major product releases and reviewed every major revision of iOS. In his "copious" free time, he's usually grinding away on a novel or two.
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For parents and others handing iOS devices over to kids, it might be wisest to lock down certain features so that children don’t stumble across things they shouldn’t, or accidentally wreak havoc upon your own device. Here’s how.

Transcript

This is Dan Moren and I’m here with this week’s video tip.

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iOS

Back up your iPhone and iPad

Serenity Caldwell Associate Editor, Macworld

Serenity has been writing and talking and tinkering with Apple products since she was old enough to double-click. In her spare time, she sketches, writes, acts, sings, and wears an assortment of hats.
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If you use your iPhone or iPad a lot, it likely has a host of vital information stored on it—information that you probably don’t want to lose. That’s why backing up your iPhone and iPad is so important. We’re going to go through two quick ways you can make a backup on your device and through your computer.

To make a wireless backup directly from your device, you’ll need an iCloud account. Once you’re logged in to iCloud, make sure your device is connected to a Wi-Fi network—you can’t make a backup over 3G. After you’ve done so, just tap Settings > iCloud > Storage & Backup, turn on the iCloud Backup toggle, and press Back Up Now.

This creates a manual backup of your device at any time. In addition, when iCloud Backup is turned on, your device automatically backs up any time it is plugged in, locked, and connected to Wi-Fi.

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How to capture your Mac's audio for free

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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You’ve likely found yourself in this position more than once: Your Mac is playing audio that you’d love a permanent copy of, but the application you’re using doesn’t provide a way to do that. While you could turn to one of the few commercial Mac applications that perform this task, there’s a way to go about it that won’t cost you a nickel. In this Macworld Video I show you how.

Transcript

Today I’m going to show you how to capture sound produced by your Mac for free.

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Get started with AirPlay

Dan Frakes Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan writes about OS X, iOS, utilities, cool apps, and troubleshooting. He also covers hardware; mobile, audio, and AV gear; input devices; and accessories. He's been writing about tech since 1994, and he's also published software, worked in IT, and worked as a policy analyst.
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AirPlay is Apple’s technology for streaming audio or video over a local network. This week’s Macworld video gives you a quick look at the most common AirPlay setups and how to configure and use them.

Transcript

I’m Macworld Senior Editor Dan Frakes. AirPlay is Apple’s technology for streaming media over a local network. Specifically, it lets you stream audio from any Mac or iOS device to any AirPlay-enabled audio system, or video from an iOS device or recent Mac to an Apple TV. AirPlay works over any modern ethernet or Wi-Fi network—The sending and receiving devices just need to be compatible with AirPlay.

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Email overload? Check out SaneBox

Dan Miller Editor, Macworld

Dan is Editor of Macworld.
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Today I wanted to give you a brief tour of a tool I’ve been relying on for a while to keep my email inbox under control.

A couple of months ago, I was moderating a panel where I interviewed some smart/savvy Mac users about their various workflows. In the course of that conversation, I found that every single one of them was using a service called SaneBox to keep their email in check. I hadn't heard of it before, so I decided to try it out.

Wheat, chaff

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Set up a kid-friendly iPad

Scholle Sawyer McFarland Senior Editor, Macworld

As summer arrives, kids across the land are spending time with the family iPad. In today’s Macworld Video, Scholle Sawyer McFarland shares some tips for making the iPad safer and more kid-friendly.

Video transcript

Perhaps your family shares an iPad or iPod touch, or perhaps your kids have gotten lucky and scored their own. Either way, before you hand over an iOS device to a kid, it’s a good idea to do a little parental preparation.

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Hit the road with Google Maps for iOS

Dan Moren Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan has been writing about all things Apple since 2006, when he first started contributing to the MacUser blog. Since then he's covered most of the company's major product releases and reviewed every major revision of iOS. In his "copious" free time, he's usually grinding away on a novel or two.
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Calling the launch of iOS’s built-in Maps app “underwhelming” might be generous. While I’d argue that Apple’s mapping efforts aren’t as bad as many people think, Google has certainly provided some stiff competition in the form of its Google Maps app for iOS. It can match many—but not all—of the features of Apple Maps, and Google’s databases of location information are arguably superior. There’s a reason we put it on the list of our apps that can replace iOS’s defaults on your phone.

In the video above, I take you on a quick walkthrough of the basic features of Google Maps, including location searching, business information, and directions—including one of its distinguishing features: public transit directions. Note that while Google Maps is currently only available on the iPhone and iPod touch, Google announced last month that the app would arrive on the iPad this summer.

Google Maps requires iOS 5.1 or later.

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