iOS

How to selectively block Internet access

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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You, as generous parent, have given your child an iPod touch. Problem is, they spend all their time on the thing texting their friends when they could so more important things like their homework. You could, of course, just pull the thing out of their hands, but if you connect to the Internet via an AirPort Base Station try this instead.

First, grab hold of their device and go to Settings > General > About. Scroll down and look for the Wi-Fi Address entry. This is the hardware address (or MAC address) that’s unique to that device. Write it down.

Now launch AirPort Utility, select the AirPort Base Station that's connected to your broadband modem (in the video I misspoke and said "router," but that's incorrect as the Base Station is the router in this case). Click Edit. Click on the Network tab and then enable the Enable Access Control option. Now click the Timed Access Control button. In the sheet that appears click on the Plus button to add a wireless client. Give your kid’s iPod a name and then enter its MAC address in this field. Now configure the pop-up menus for those days and times wireless access is allowed—so maybe for an hour or two after they come home from school during the week and a few hours on the weekend.

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Macworld Video: Organize your iPhone photos with Image Capture

Serenity Caldwell Associate Editor, Macworld

Serenity has been writing and talking and tinkering with Apple products since she was old enough to double-click. In her spare time, she sketches, writes, acts, sings, and wears an assortment of hats.
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It’s easy to take silly photos or screenshots on your iPhone, but what happens if you want to get rid of them without having to manually select each one? I take a lot of screenshots on my iPhone for reviews and news articles, and using my Mac and the Image Capture app, it’s easy to delete the images I no longer want and instantly download the ones I do.

Plug in your iPhone and open Image Capture. The Image Capture app isn’t very flashy, but it loads your phone and its photos quickly, saving you from having to launch a slower program like iPhoto. First and foremost, the program lets you download recently-taken images: Just sort by Date taken and select the pictures you want; then click the Import button to download them to your computer. From there, you can upload them to Facebook, Twitter, email, your blog, or your favorite social media platform.

To delete images, select the photos you want, then press the red delete button. Just like that, they’ll vanish from your phone. You can also rotate your images by using the arrow button next to the delete button.

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Get more out of OS X's save-as-PDF feature

Dan Frakes Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan writes about OS X, iOS, troubleshooting, utilities, and cool apps; and he covers hardware, mobile and AV gear, input devices, and accessories. He's been writing about tech since 1994, and he's also published software, worked in IT, and been a policy analyst.
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One of OS X’s most-useful features is the capability to save any printable document, webpage, or file as a PDF. This week’s video shows you some nifty ways to get more out of this feature.

Transcript

One of my favorite features of OS X is the built-in capability to save any printable document, webpage, or file as a PDF. You do this, confusingly enough, from within each app’s Print dialog box. Simply choose File > Print, click the PDF pop-up menu at the bottom of the Print dialog box, and then choose Save As PDF. You then navigate to the folder where you want to put the resulting PDF, and click Save. You get a PDF version of the document in that folder.

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Clean up your Apple TV's homescreen

Dan Moren Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan has been writing about all things Apple since 2006, when he first started contributing to the MacUser blog. Since then he's covered most of the company's major product releases and reviewed every major revision of iOS. In his "copious" free time, he's usually grinding away on a novel or two.
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Apple added yet another channel to the Apple TV this week, meaning there are more than 30 icons on the device’s homescreen. That can be a lot, especially if you don’t use all of those content providers on a regular basis. Allow me to help you make that glut of icons a bit more manageable.

Transcript

This is Macworld senior editor Dan Moren. With all the options on the Apple TV these days, loading up that grid of icons can often be overwhelming. Here are a couple of quick tips to organize the Apple TV’s homescreen to your liking.

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Delete Mac partitions without losing data

Christopher Breen Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Chris has covered technology and media since the latter days of the Reagan Administration. In addition to his journalistic endeavors, he's a professional musician in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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In a recent Mac 911 entry I explained how to turn two hard drive partitions into one. And while words are great, sometimes it’s more helpful to see something like this in action. And so was this week’s Macworld video conceived.

Note that in the video I state that you can't partition the drive you've booted from. This is incorrect. You can create an additional partition from the free space the drive holds. It's not cogent to this particular exercise but I regret the error.

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How to shoot and share slo-mo video on your iPhone 5s

Serenity Caldwell Associate Editor, Macworld

Serenity has been writing and talking and tinkering with Apple products since she was old enough to double-click. In her spare time, she sketches, writes, acts, sings, and wears an assortment of hats.
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If you haven’t yet played around with Apple’s slo-mo feature on the iPhone 5s, now’s a perfect time to start. This week’s video tip has Macworld associate editor Serenity Caldwell demonstrating how to shoot slo-mo video, preview it on your own device, and share it with others.

Transcript: One of the great features of the iPhone 5s is its slow motion video mode. To use this mode, just swipe over while in the Camera app to the Slo-Mo setting.

To begin shooting a slow-motion video, make sure you’ve got your target focused, then press the record button. Your video will begin recording in what looks like real time, but don’t be fooled: there’s some slow-motion magic yet to come.

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How to set up port forwarding

Dan Moren Senior Editor, Macworld Follow me on Google+

Dan has been writing about all things Apple since 2006, when he first started contributing to the MacUser blog. Since then he's covered most of the company's major product releases and reviewed every major revision of iOS. In his "copious" free time, he's usually grinding away on a novel or two.
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For so many of us, networking hardware is a necessary evil. It's great when it works, but once it does, we just want to leave it alone. But if you've ever run into an app or service that requires "port forwarding" and have thrown up your hands in frustration, don't worry. I'm here to show you it's not so scary after all.

The instructions are specifically for AirPort base stations; check out PortForward.com for instructions for a variety of other routers, or consult your router's manual.

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