The secret to great presentations: it's not about the software

Joe Kissell Senior Contributor, Macworld

Joe Kissell is a senior editor of TidBits and the author of numerous ebooks in the Take Control series, including the just-published Take Control of Apple Mail.
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I’ve sat through countless dull PowerPoint and Keynote presentations. And I’ll admit that some of my own have been snoozers, too. Based on my observations of presentations by others, and on feedback I’ve received about my own, I’d like to share one simple tip for making your presentations better: Don’t focus on your presentation software.

You read that right: In some of the most successful presentations I’ve seen, I barely noticed what was on the screen. If your audience leaves feeling informed, inspired, or entertained, you’ve done a better job than if they leave talking about your fancy 3D effects.

Start with the message

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How to prepare for a Mac disaster

Joe Kissell Senior Contributor, Macworld

Joe Kissell is a senior editor of TidBits and the author of numerous ebooks in the Take Control series, including the just-published Take Control of Apple Mail.
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No one likes to think about disasters such as burglary, earthquake, fire, the zombie apocalypse, or other catastrophes that could potentially wipe out your Mac, your other gadgets, and perhaps even your entire home or office. But these things do happen (with the possible exception of the zombies), and despite your best efforts, you might not be able to prevent the loss. You can, however, minimize the damage and inconvenience you’ll suffer—and speed your recovery—by making sure you’ve taken a number of commonsense steps to prepare for misfortune ahead of time.

Insurance

Let’s start with your hardware itself—your Mac(s), hard drives, monitors, printer, scanner, and so on. If you pulled into your driveway and found a huge crater where your home used to be, replacing that equipment will probably be in the top ten items on your post-tragedy to-do list. Will your insurance cover it? If you haven’t checked into that question specifically, this might be a good time to study your policy or chat about it with your insurance agent.

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How much of your job can you really do on an iPad?

Macworld Staff Editors, Macworld

The Macworld staff occasionally work on articles together. You're reading one of those articles right now.
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Tim Cook recently said that he performs 80% of his work on an iPad—and he thinks everyone should do the same. But is that really realistic?

The answer depends, of course, on the kind of work you do. Perhaps Cook spends his entire day working in email and a browser. If that’s the case, the iPad could be entirely adequate. When he was quoted, Cook was specifically touting the iOS-compatibility that will come to many corporate apps, thanks to Apple’s new alliance with IBM. So if you’re living in apps that your company built for itself, the iPad could someday be all you need.

But what about the rest of us, whose work tools lie somewhere between a Web browser and bespoke corporate software? To get a take on how well the iPad suits at least one specific job-description, I asked some editors here at Macworld, as well as at our sister publications PC World and Greenbot, to tell me: How much of your job do you currently do on an iPad? And how much could you do if you really had to?

Dan Frakes (Senior Editor, Macworld)

Most of my routine writing and editing happens on my desktop Mac. But I do use my iPad a good number of hours each day—in the morning, at lunch, in the evening, and during writing breaks—to read my innumerable RSS feeds, triage email, and perform other tasks that don’t require the complex workflows and multitasking I get on my Mac. For these tasks, the iPad is simply a better tool for me.

That’s not to say that I couldn’t do more on my iPad during the work day. I always have an external Bluetooth keyboard handy, so longer bouts of writing and email are easy enough. (In fact, I’m writing this on my iPad with Logitech’s Ultrathin Magnetic Clip-on Keyboard Cover.) An external keyboard is great for serious email correspondence, too. (Alas, I find editing on an iPad to be a chore because of iOS’s fiddly text select/copy/cut/paste mechanism.)

Dan Miller (Editor, Macworld)

I do use the iPad for work, but not much. I could use it more, but frankly I see no reason to: I have a perfectly good (if heavy) MacBook Pro, which I don’t mind lugging around and which I find better as a work tool than the iPad.

That said, I could use the iPad for more of my work if I had to. As others have pointed out, the bulk of my job involved processing text. For most writing and editing, I work primarily in plain-text format these days, for which almost any iOS text-editor would do. Ditto for taking notes in meetings and elsewhere. (I generally use nValt on my MacBook for this, syncing its plain-text notes via Dropbox.) For those outside writers who still use Word, we have iOS tools for that, too.

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Ten things everyone should know how to do with a word processor

Jeffery Battersby , Macworld

Jeffery Battersby is an Apple Certified Trainer, (very) smalltime actor, and regular contributor to Macworld. He writes about Macs and more at his blog, jeffbattersby.com.
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Admit it: You don’t use half the tools in your word processing app—whether it’s Microsoft Word, Apple’s own Pages, or Google Docs—maybe even less than half. But without all those bells and whistles you’ve been ignoring, that app is little more than a glorified text editor. (Not that there’s anything wrong with that: I use my favorite text editor, BBEdit, as a glorified word processor.)

But a big part of owning a tool is knowing how to use it effectively. So if you ever use Word, Pages, or Google Docs, you owe it to yourself to know how to do a few essential things with it. Here are the ten of the most essential.

1. Use Keyboard Shortcuts

6. Format a Table

Once you have your table inserted, it’s time to make it pretty. Because table formatting can be complicated, these applications offer separate formatting options for entire tables, for individual cells, and for the text that appears within your tables. (The keyboard shortcuts mentioned earlier for text formatting work on table text quite well.)

Word: Word offers a multitude of table-formatting options, all of which you manage using the Tables tab in Word’s toolbar. In fact, Word’s table tool offers nearly the same set of formatting features available in Excel.

9. Track and Manage Changes

Are you working collaboratively on a document and want to keep track of who has made which changes? Pages, Word, and Google Docs all offer tools for tracking the changes in your documents. Using these tools you can see who has made changes to a document, accept or reject changes, and add comments.

Word: Open the Tools menu, select Track Changes, then choose Highlight Changes. This opens a dialog box where you can select options for how you want to track your changes. The Options button in this dialog box lets you change the way the text you’ve changed will appear in the document. If you want to see your changes as you type, check the Track Changes While Editing box.

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Nine things everyone should know how to do with a spreadsheet

Rob Griffiths Senior Contributor, Macworld

Former Macworld Senior Editor Rob Griffiths founded Mac OS X Hints. He's now master of ceremonies at Many Tricks Software.
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If your job (or even your personal life) requires you to do anything substantial with numbers, chances are you use a spreadsheet app to do it. As a Mac user, you’ve got plenty of choices among spreadsheet apps, but for most of us the choice comes down to three: Microsoft’s Excel 2011; Apple’s Numbers (version 3.2); and the browser-based Sheets section of Google Docs.

The one to use is really a personal choice, and that decision is not the focus of this article. (I personally prefer Excel, possibly because I’ve been using it for nearly 30 years). But regardless of the app you use, the question here is: How well do you know how to use it, really?

As a spreadsheet vet, I gave that question some thought and came up with the following list of things that I think every savvy spreadsheet jockey—not beginners, but people who’ve been using one of these apps for a while—should know. I’m not talking about any specific task. Rather, these are the techniques and concepts that I think you should know in order to graduate from casual to serious user.

4. Distinguish Between Relative and Absolute References

In the functions listed above, CELL and RANGE are references to either an individual cell or a range of cells. So =ROUND(C14,2) will take the value in cell C14 and round it off to two digits; =SUM(A10:A20) will add up all the numbers in cells A10 through A20.

You can enter these cell locations either by typing them or by clicking (or, for ranges, clicking and dragging) the mouse.

7. Perform Logical Tests

Many times, you need to set a cell’s value based on the results of one of more other cell values. For instance, in the worksheet for the shipping supplies company, the Order Alert column is either blank (if there’s plenty of stock on hand) or it contains the Order Soon! warning (when inventory is getting low).

How can one cell display two possible values? By using a logical function. Each of these spreadsheet apps includes a number of logical functions; the three particularly useful ones below appear in all three apps.

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How to make two-factor authentication less of a pain

Joe Kissell Senior Contributor, Macworld

Joe Kissell is a senior editor of TidBits and the author of numerous ebooks in the Take Control series, including the just-published Take Control of Apple Mail.
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You probably know by now that you should never use the same password in more than one place, and that each of your passwords should be strong enough to resist an automated attack. Perhaps you use iCloud Keychain, or a third-party password manager such as 1Password or LastPass to generate random passwords, store them, and fill them in automatically. But all that may not be enough if a site suffers a security breach that reveals its users passwords to an attacker—sadly, a frequent occurrence.

At the moment, the best defense against such attacks is two-factor (or two-step) authentication, in which you need more than just a username and password to log in on an untrusted device. You also need a second element, which often takes the form of a numeric string sent by SMS and so foils any attacker who has your password but not your phone. Most major Internet companies offer two-factor authentication as an option—you can read how to set this up for your Apple ID (which now applies to the iCloud website as well), Dropbox, Evernote, Facebook, Google, and Twitter, for example.

The problem with two-factor authentication is that it’s a bother, requiring an extra, manual step. Usually you have to do this only once per device or app, after which point ordinary logins work, but even so, it’s a pain. Here are a couple of ways to reduce that inconvenience.

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Beyond the basics: OS X's advanced printer tools

Topher Kessler , Macworld

Topher Kessler has been an avid Mac user since 1991. He was the primary contributing author to CNET's MacFixIt blog from 2008 to 2014 and currently posts at MacIssues (macissues.com).
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Setting up a printer in OS X is often as simple as plugging it in to your Mac or connecting to a shared printer on the local network. From these simple cases, you probably know how to use the system’s Print & Fax system preferences pane to configure the printer. But there are a few other ways to connect and manage printers that you might not be so familiar with.

Add shared printers on the fly

While you can add a shared printer available to your system using the Printers & Scanners pane in System Preferences, you can also do so from the print dialogue in any document. In the Printer drop-down in the standard Print dialog, you will see an submenu labeled Nearby Printers. Choosing a printer from that list will cause OS X to automatically install its driver and set it up for use.

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