Don't-Miss MacBook Stories

Review: SpaceNavigator for Notebooks

SpaceNavigator for Notebooks, a laptop mouse designed for 3-D navigation, lets you move horizontally, vertically, and in a third dimension of depth within your 3-D space.

Review: MacBook Pro Core 2 Duo/2.4GHz and 2.5GHz

If you've been waiting to buy a new Apple laptop, or you've been hesitating about upgrading from your G4 PowerBook, wait no longer. While the 2.4GHz model is a fine value for the money, the higher-end 15-inch and 17-inch models are outstanding top-of-the-line models for any professional, artistic, scientific, or scholastic application.

15-inch MacBook Pro/2.5GHz

Like the MacBooks, the MacBook Pro line gets the latest generation of Core 2 Duo chips code-named Penryn. That boosts the amount of L2 cache to 6MB on the 2.5GHz models; this model also sports more video RAM for its Nvidia GeForce 8600M GT graphics processor. The MacBook Pro adds the MultiTouch trackpad first introduced in the MacBook Air.

17-inch MacBook Pro/2.5GHz

Like the MacBooks, the MacBook Pro line gets the latest generation of Core 2 Duo chips code-named Penryn. That boosts the amount of L2 cache to 6MB on the 2.5GHz models; this model also sports more video RAM for its Nvidia GeForce 8600M GT graphics processor, as well as a third USB 2.0 port. he MacBook Pro adds the MultiTouch trackpad first introduced in the MacBook Air.

15-inch MacBook Pro/2.4GHz

Like the MacBooks, the MacBook Pro line gets the latest generation of Core 2 Duo chips code-named Penryn. That boosts the amount of L2 cache to 6MB on the 2.5GHz models (though the cache drops to 3MB on this system). The MacBook Pro also adds the MultiTouch trackpad first introduced in the MacBook Air.

Review: MacBook Core 2 Duo/2.1GHz and 2.4GHz

Macworld Lab has been putting the new MacBooks to the test. Benchmarks show that the new MacBooks, based on Intel's new Penryn processor, offer a modest speed increase over the previous MacBooks.

13-inch MacBook/2.4GHz (black)

The next-generation of the Core 2 Duo processor -- code-named Penryn -- highlights this round of MacBook updates. The processor upgrade delivers faster speeds than the previous generation, but less shared L2 cache (3MB, compared to 4MB in the previous generation). Hard-drive capacities have also jumped -- this top-of-the-line model offers 250GB of storage, in addition to a black matte finish. Like the white 2.4GHz MacBook, this model now ships with 2GB of RAM.

13-inch MacBook/2.4GHz (white)

The next-generation of the Core 2 Duo processor -- code-named Penryn -- highlights this round of MacBook updates. The processor upgrade delivers faster speeds than the previous generation, but less shared L2 cache (3MB, compared to 4MB in the previous generation). Hard-drive capacities have also jumped -- this model now offers 160GB of storage. And both 2.4GHz MacBooks ship with 2GB of memory installed.

13-inch MacBook/2.1GHz

Essentially, this is the same 2.1GHz MacBook Apple introduced in February 2008 right down to its white plastic enclosure and FireWire ports--something Apple abandoned with the rest of its MacBook offerings. The main difference between this model and the one Apple introduced in February is the optical drive -- this MacBook now features a DVD-burning SuperDrive -- and the price tag. This model breaks the $1,000 barrier for the Intel-based MacBooks.

13-inch MacBook/2.1GHz

The next-generation of the Core 2 Duo processor -- code-named Penryn -- highlights this round of MacBook updates. The processor upgrade delivers faster speeds than the previous generation, but less shared L2 cache (3MB, compared to 4MB in the previous generation). Hard-drive capacities have also jumped -- this entry-level model now offers 120GB of storage, up from 80GB. However, this model only ships with 1GB of RAM installed; the other MacBooks now offer 2GB.

Review: MacBook Air (first-generation)

The decision about whether the MacBook Air is a product worth having can be answered by one question: How much are you willing to compromise? In his extensive review of the latest Apple laptop, Jason Snell looks at what trade-offs you'll have to make and whether the MacBook Air is the right machine for your needs.

MacBook Air/1.6GHz

Mac users now have a three-pound, thin laptop to call their own, but it comes with tradeoffs. The MacBook Air comes without an optical drive (though there's an optional USB SuperDrive you can buy for $99), so you'll have to install programs via the machine's Remote Disk software. There's also no Gigabit Ethernet (again, available as an optional add-on) and no FireWire port. In addition to accessories, users can also opt for a 1.8GHz processor or a 64GB solid-state drive.

Neo-Flex Stand Delivers

If you use your laptop at a desk regularly, Ergotron's Neo-Flex is one of the more configurable notebook stands on the market.