Don't-Miss Stories

Facebook adds photo drag-and-drop to desktop app

The giant social network makes sharing your photos on its site more convenient.

on techhive.com

FTC tightens privacy rules for kids’ apps

App platforms such as Apple’s App Store are exempt from new FTC regulations that require apps to obtain parental consent before following children’s online behavior.

on techhive.com

Instagram uproar is a tempest in a TOS teapot

Instagram users are upset with the photo-sharing service's terms of service. But those terms really haven't changed from what they were before. And Lauren Crabbe argues that there's more objectionable things about Instagram.

on techhive.com

Angry with Instagram? Try these alternatives

Instagram has updated its terms of service, and many Instagram users are not happy about what they've read. If you'd like to jump off the Instagram bandwagon, check out these photo-sharing alternatives.

Facebook launches significant new privacy changes

The moves by the giant social network make it easier for users to access privacy controls.

on techhive.com

Privacy group files complaint against kids' mobile game maker

The popular mobile children's game Mobbles collects personal information from children without providing notice to parents or attempting to get parental consent, in violation of U.S. law, a privacy group said in a complaint to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.

Facebook holds vote on right to vote, data-sharing policy

Facebook users will be able to vote until noon Pacific/3 p.m. Eastern on December 10.

on pcworld.com

Facebook policy change questioned by Irish government

The Office of the Irish Data Protection Commissioner has asked Facebook to tweak its proposed policy changes

Privacy groups ask Facebook to back off privacy changes

Facebook wants to remove the ability for users to vote on modifications to data usage and privacy policies

on techhive.com

U.S. Capitol

Senate bill to allow warrantless government access to your online services

A Senate bill that, at one point, would have protected e-mail privacy has gone the opposite way, and would allow government surveillance of online services without a warrant if passed into law.

on pcworld.com