Don't-Miss Stories

Microsoft turns Siri against Apple in hilarious new Windows 8 ad

Who knew a soulless digital assistant could be so hilariously inept?

Remains of the Day: Anybody want a peanut?

The DOJ wants to put Apple on ice for collusion on ebooks' price. Elsewhere, if an iPhone button wiggles, is it more than just a niggle? And to get some relief, Siri asks you to please keep it brief.

The Macalope: Applefail is a one-way street

It's easy to look at Apple's faults when all you look at is Apple's faults!

Hands on: Google Now is less of a concierge, more of a valet

Google has rolled out its Google Now intelligent assistant features to iOS users. Dan Moren takes a look at what it offers to busy, on-the-go iPhone and iPad owners.

Remains of the Day: At long last

Siri's eidetic memory has an expiration date after all, Apple gets a brush off from some Antarctic birds, and Tim Cook reaches the end of his tether.

Remains of the Day: Never forget

Amazon took not just a page from Apple's book, but apparently a whole site. Elsewhere, Intel is telling it like it is, and Jonathan Ive racks up yet another major award.

Inside Siri's brain: The challenges of extending Apple's virtual assistant

Siri is one of the biggest features to hit iOS in recent years, and yet it remains severely limited in its capabilities. Alas, Apple--and third-party developers--must overcome many obstacles before voice interaction becomes a pervasive part of the mobile experience.

Remains of the Day: Witness for the prosecution

Siri's getting its day in court, Apple's putting boots on the ground around the world, and the Biggest Little City in the World is getting its head in the cloud.

Remains of the Day: A long, long time ago

Next time you drive the Chevy to the levee, you can do it with Siri's help. Elsewhere, do you remember where you were the day the MacBook Pro's slogan died? And Apple proves no moss grows on a rolling iPhone.

An iPhone fan's month with Windows Phone: Week four

After a month on Windows Phone, Macworld senior writer Lex Friedman is finally allowed to power up his iPhone 5 again. But he's taken away some valuable lessons from the competition.