Macworld May Issue Abstract

The May issue of Macworld is now on the newsstands and ready for your perusal. If you would like to read the entire issue online, we will post it on April 20. As always, we will continue to post reviews as soon as they are available. To see a list of this month's reviews, please click here. To read what stories we covered in the other magazine sections, please read the abstract below.

Whether you're a publishing maven, mobile office professional, hobbyist, or hardcore gamer, there's a Mac that's right for you–and we've found it. After gathering every shipping Mac, we put them to the test in Macworld Lab.

And we didn't stop there. We teamed up our experts to give you top-notch advice on the right peripherals and software programs for four different types of users: creative-arts gurus, business professionals, home users, and gaming enthusiasts. So browse through each section to find our recommendations best suited for the way you work and play.

When it comes to professional page layout, QuarkXPress has been just about the only game in town. But all that may be about to change this summer when Adobe ships a brand-new contender–Adobe InDesign.

Macworld took a look at an early prerelease version of this new page layout program to see what may be in store for you. We explore what InDesign will offer, from it's time-saving features to its ability to be completely customized. Get ready. From what we saw, this may be the first real alternative to QuarkXPress in years.

What do records, eight-track tapes, and floppy disks have in common? They served us well but have disappeared from everyday use because more-efficient devices have replaced them. Now your analog modem is about to join them.

Macworld takes an in-depth look at the new technologies that are replacing the analog modem: ISDN, DSL, and cable modems, complete with speed testing from Macworld Lab. And if you aren't ready to make the switch, we also put five 56K modems to the test and pick the winner–a modem that might be the last you'll ever buy.

Click here to read the reviews from the May issue.

For the first time, you can create an interactive project in Macromedia Director without having to write a lick of Lingo, Director's scripting language. That's because Director has greatly enhanced its library of canned Lingo scripts (called behaviors). To prove just how much easier multimedia authoring in Director 7 is, long-time Macworld author Jim Heid guides you through the process of creating an interactive project using Director's new features. You'll learn how to embed fonts, play QuickTime-movies, and create buttons that behave. You can also go right now to to see a sample project that he created with Director 7.

Let your computer take the drudgery out of your publishing workflow. You can trigger an entire workflow simply by dragging a file into a folder using Applescript's new feature Folder Actions. David Blatner, an authority on QuarkXPress, Photoshop, and scripting, leads you through the step-by-step process of creating a script that turns a QuarkXPress document into a Web-ready file. He makes it easy to write your own AppleScript scripts, especially because he supplies his sample scripts on

Get a behind-the-scenes look at how artist Frank Kozik makes digital art that looks as though it were created with paint and pen. We deconstruct a piece of his artwork that imitates the look-and-feel of a weathered billboard. Kozik has been creating concert posters and album-cover art for underground bands since the mid 1980s. He's probably best known to Macintosh users for his in-your-face illustrations for now-defunct Mac-clone maker Power Computing.

This month columnist Joseph Schorr reveals secrets about using the unsung hero the Location Manager utility. Get tips that you can use to simplify your work even on a desktop machine. It's not just for frequent flyers anymore.

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