A Mac nerd among otaku

I spent this past weekend attending Anime Boston 2007, a three-day annual event held at the Hynes Convention Center in Boston’s Back Bay that celebrates Japanese animation, known to its fans by its Japanese name—anime. Going to an anime convention, or con, is a lot like going to a computer show like Macworld Expo about 15 years ago—though there are a lot more people dressed in costumes. If you ever get the chance to go to one, I’d recommend it—it’s a ton of fun.

Anime Boston is the biggest such event in the northeastern United States, and in the five years since it started, it’s become one of the biggest anime cons in the country. This year, the show attracted more than 11,500 registrants—almost 10 times the number that showed up the first year. I imagine our friends at IDG World Expo would fall over themselves to see that sort of growth in an industry event like Macworld Expo.

Our Playlist readers probably won’t be surprised to learn that I’m an anime fan — our recent coverage of U.S. publisher Funimation’s release of some of its key anime titles on the iTunes Store led to an active story forum where several readers and I ticked off our our own favorite Funimation properties that we’d like to see available at the Store. (And I’m pleased to see Funimation has continued to add titles.) But if you’re wondering what drew me to Anime Boston, specifically, it’s largely my wife’s doing. She’s into anime like I’m into games. We’ve been coming to Anime Boston since its first year, but this is the first time I’ve really made a concerted effort to cover the show from a Mac user’s perspective.

I’ve been going to computer shows since I was a kid, practically since there were computer shows, starting in the late 1970s. If you’re a long-time computer user or a long-time Mac user, you might remember those events and how different they are from the expos of today. Back then there wasn’t the spit and polish of a modern trade show.

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