Katherine NoyesSenior U.S. Correspondent, IDG News Service

Katherine Noyes has been an ardent geek ever since she first conquered Pyramid of Doom on an ancient TRS-80. Today she covers enterprise software in all its forms, with an emphasis on cloud computing, big data, analytics and artificial intelligence.

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Apple's Cook calls European tax ruling 'total political crap'

The European Commission's decision to force Apple to pay Ireland billions in back taxes is "total political crap" and a reflection of anti-U.S. sentiment, company CEO Tim Cook said in an interview published Thursday.

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Dropbox Paper, now in open beta, lets teams collaborate in the cloud

Ten months after Dropbox first unveiled Paper, the collaborative writing tool entered open beta on Wednesday and is getting mobile versions for iOS and Android.

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Got privacy? If you use Twitter or a smartphone, maybe not so much

The notion of online privacy has been greatly diminished in recent years, and just this week two new studies confirm what to many minds is already a dismal picture.

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Apple partners with SAP in new enterprise push

The mobile enterprise got another boost on Thursday with the announcement of a brand-new partnership between Apple and SAP.

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Dominos has the droid you're looking for, and it's bringing you your pizza

If data science can be used to craft a brand-new beer, why shouldn't an autonomous droid deliver the accompanying pizza?

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Are you drinking while tweeting? This algorithm can tell

A new algorithm can tell when you're drinking while tweeting—and even figure out where you're imbibing.

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This wacky Twitterbot uses deep learning to out-Trump Trump

Anyone who's ever shaken their head over the utterances coming out of Donald Trump's mouth will surely be glad to know that they're now being improved with deep learning. The only catch: It's not Trump doing the learning, but rather a Twitter robot.

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This new wireless tech lets monkeys control a wheelchair using just their thoughts

New wireless technology makes it possible for monkeys to control a robotic wheelchair using just their thoughts without the need to be hooked up via EEG electrodes on the scalp to a connected computer.